Women's One Day International

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Women's One Day International (ODI) is the limited overs form of women's cricket. Matches are scheduled for 50 overs, equivalent to the men's game. The first women's ODIs were played in 1973, as part of the first Women's World Cup which was held in England. The first ODI would have been between New Zealand and Jamaica on 20 June 1973, but was abandoned without a ball being bowled, due to rain.[1] Therefore, the first women's ODIs to take place were three matches played three days later.[2]

The 1,000th women's ODI took place between South Africa and New Zealand on 13 October 2016.[3]

Women's ODI status is determined by the International Cricket Council (ICC) and was restricted to full members of the ICC. In May 2022, the ICC awarded ODI status to five more teams.[4]

Involved nations[edit]

In 2006 the ICC announced that only the top-10 ranked sides would have Test and ODI status. During the 2011 Women's Cricket World Cup Qualifier Netherlands lost its ODI status by virtue of not finishing in the top 6 placings. As the top 4 teams with ODI status were not required to take part in this qualifying tournament, the top 6 in this tournament constituted the top 10 overall placings. Bangladesh replaced the Netherlands as one of the ten countries which currently have ODI status.[5]

In September 2018, ICC chief executive Dave Richardson announced that all matches at ICC World Cup Qualifiers would be awarded ODI status.[6] However, in November 2021, the ICC reversed this decision and determined that all fixtures in the Women's World Cup Qualifier featuring a team without ODI status would be recorded as a List A match.[7] This followed an announcement retrospectively applying first-class and List A status to women's cricket.[8][9]

In April 2021, the ICC awarded permanent Test and ODI status to all full member women's teams.[10] Afghanistan and Zimbabwe gained ODI status for the first time as a result of this decision. In May 2022, the ICC awarded women's ODI status to the Netherlands, Papua New Guinea, Scotland, Thailand and the United States;[11] all of these nations other than Scotland had qualified for the abandoned 2021 Women's Cricket World Cup Qualifier (although PNG withdrew from the qualifier due to COVID-19).

The following teams have also played ODIs, but currently do not have ODI status, although they may qualify to regain that status in the future.

There are also four other teams which once had ODI status, but either no longer exist or no longer play international cricket. Three appeared only in the 1973 Women's Cricket World Cup.

Rankings[edit]

Before October 2018, ICC did not maintain a separate Twenty20 ranking for the women's game, instead aggregating performance over all three forms of the game into one overall women's teams ranking.[12] In January 2018, ICC granted international status to all matches between associate nations and announced plan to launch separate T20I rankings for women.[13] In October 2018 the T20I rankings were launched with separate ODI rankings for Full Members.[14]

ICC Women's ODI Rankings
Rank Team Matches Points Rating
1  Australia 29 4,716 163
2  England 23 2,991 130
3  South Africa 27 3,152 117
4  India 21 2,004 95
5  New Zealand 24 2,262 94
6  West Indies 20 1,768 88
7  Sri Lanka 9 714 79
8  Bangladesh 19 1,505 79
9  Thailand 11 753 68
10  Pakistan 27 1,843 68
11  Ireland 19 675 36
12  Netherlands 9 94 10
13  Zimbabwe 12 122 10
Reference: ICC Women's ODI rankings, Updated on 26 March 2024

Team statistics[edit]

Team Span Matches Won Lost Tied NR % Won
 Australia 1973– 358 283 66 2 7 79.05
 Bangladesh 2011– 63 17 39 2 5 26.98
 Denmark 1989–1999 33 6 27 0 0 18.18
 England 1973– 383 227 142 2 12 59.26
 India 1978– 304 165 133 2 4 54.27
 International XI 1973–1982 18 3 14 0 1 17.64
 Ireland 1987– 170 47 116 0 7 27.64
 Jamaica 1973 5 1 4 0 0 20.00
 Japan 2003 5 0 5 0 0 0.00
 Netherlands 1984– 110 20 89 0 1 18.18
 New Zealand 1973– 379 186 182 3 8 49.07
 Pakistan 1997– 203 59 138 3 3 29.06
 Scotland 2001– 11 2 9 0 0 18.18
 South Africa 1997– 236 124 97 5 10 52.54
 Sri Lanka 1997– 181 60 114 0 7 33.14
 Thailand 2022– 9 8 1 0 0 100.00
 Trinidad and Tobago 1973 6 2 4 0 0 33.33
 West Indies 1979– 215 93 110 3 9 43.25
England Young England 1973 6 1 5 0 0 16.66
 Zimbabwe 2021– 11 1 10 0 0 9.09
Source: Cricinfo, as 24 December 2023. The result percentage excludes no results and counts ties as half a win.

Records[edit]

As of December 2023.

Batting[edit]

Record First Second Ref
Most runs India Mithali Raj 7805 England Charlotte Edwards 5992 [15]
Highest average (Min 20 innings) England Rachael Heyhoe-Flint 58.45 Australia Lindsay Reeler 57.44 [16]
Highest score New Zealand Amelia Kerr 232* Australia Belinda Clark 229* [17]
Most centuries Australia Meg Lanning 15 New Zealand Suzie Bates 12 [18]
Most 50s (and over) India Mithali Raj 71 England Charlotte Edwards 55 [19]

Bowling[edit]

Record First Second Ref
Most Wickets India Jhulan Goswami 255 South AfricaShabnim Ismail 191 [20]
Best Average (min. 1000 balls bowled) England Gill Smith 12.53 Australia Lyn Fullston 13.26 [21]
Best Economy rate (min. 1000 balls bowled) New Zealand Sue Brown 1.81 Australia Sharon Tredrea 1.86 [22]
Best bowling figures Pakistan Sajjida Shah vs  Japan (2003) 7/4 England Jo Chamberlain vs  Denmark (1991) 7/8 [23]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "ABANDONED 1st Match, London, June 20, 1973, Women's World Cup". ESPNCricinfo. Retrieved 29 January 2024.
  2. ^ "Women's World Cup 1973 - Schedule & Results". ESPNCricinfo. Retrieved 25 March 2024.
  3. ^ "South Africa and New Zealand to feature in 1000th women's ODI". ICC. 12 October 2016. Archived from the original on 13 October 2016. Retrieved 12 October 2016.
  4. ^ "Two new teams in next edition of ICC Women's Championship". International Cricket Council. Retrieved 25 May 2022.
  5. ^ "Bangladesh secure ODI status with wins". ESPNcricinfo. 24 November 2011. Retrieved 5 April 2024.
  6. ^ "ICC awards Asia Cup ODI status". International Cricket Council. 9 September 2018. Retrieved 24 November 2021.
  7. ^ "Bangladesh trounce USA; Pakistan survive Thailand banana peel". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 23 November 2021.
  8. ^ "ICC Board appoints Afghanistan Working Group". International Cricket Council. Retrieved 17 November 2021.
  9. ^ "ICC appoints Working Group to review status of Afghanistan cricket; women's First Class, List A classification to align with men's game". Women's CricZone. Retrieved 17 November 2021.
  10. ^ "The International Cricket Council (ICC) Board and Committee meetings have concluded following a series of virtual conference calls". ICC. 1 April 2021. Retrieved 1 April 2021.
  11. ^ "Bangladesh, Ireland added to 2022-25 Women's Championship; no India vs Pakistan series slotted". ESPN Cricinfo. Retrieved 25 May 2022.
  12. ^ "ICC Women's Team Rankings launched". International Cricket Council. Archived from the original on 25 December 2016. Retrieved 12 January 2017.
  13. ^ "Women's Twenty20 Playing Conditions" (PDF). International Cricket Council. Archived from the original (PDF) on 24 July 2011. Retrieved 9 February 2010.
  14. ^ "ICC Launches Global Women's T20I Team Rankings". 12 October 2018. Retrieved 13 October 2018.
  15. ^ "Women's One-Day Internationals / Batting records / Most runs in career". Cricinfo. Retrieved 13 September 2019.
  16. ^ "Women's One-Day Internationals / Batting records / Highest career batting average". Cricinfo. Retrieved 13 September 2019.
  17. ^ "Women's One-Day Internationals / Batting records / Most runs in an innings". Cricinfo. Retrieved 13 September 2019.
  18. ^ "Women's One-Day Internationals / Batting records / Most hundreds in a career". Cricinfo. Retrieved 13 September 2019.
  19. ^ "Women's One-Day Internationals / Batting records / Most fifties in career". Cricinfo. Retrieved 13 September 2019.
  20. ^ "Women's One-Day Internationals / Bowling records / Most wickets in career". Cricinfo. Retrieved 13 September 2019.
  21. ^ "Women's One-Day Internationals / Bowling records / Best career bowling average". Cricinfo. Retrieved 13 September 2019.
  22. ^ "Women's One-Day Internationals / Bowling records / Best career economy rate". Cricinfo. Retrieved 13 September 2019.
  23. ^ "Women's One-Day Internationals / Bowling records / Best figures in an innings". Cricinfo. Retrieved 13 September 2019.