Taylor v. United States (2016)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Taylor v. United States
Argued February 23, 2016
Decided June 20, 2016
Full case nameDavid Anthony Taylor, Petitioner v. United States
Docket no.14-6166
Citations579 U.S. ___ (more)
136 S. Ct. 2074; 195 L. Ed. 2d 456
Opinion announcementOpinion announcement
Case history
PriorUnited States v. Taylor, 754 F.3d 217 (4th Cir. 2014)
Holding
In a federal criminal prosecution under the Hobbs Act, the government is not required to prove an interstate commerce element beyond a reasonable doubt.
Court membership
Chief Justice
John Roberts
Associate Justices
Anthony Kennedy · Clarence Thomas
Ruth Bader Ginsburg · Stephen Breyer
Samuel Alito · Sonia Sotomayor
Elena Kagan
Case opinions
MajorityAlito, joined by Roberts, Kennedy, Ginsburg, Breyer, Sotomayor, Kagan
DissentThomas
Laws applied
Hobbs Act

Taylor v. United States, 579 U.S. ___ (2016), was a United States Supreme Court case in which the Court held that in a federal criminal prosecution under the Hobbs Act, the government is not required to prove an interstate commerce element beyond a reasonable doubt.[1][2] The Court relied on the decision in Gonzales v. Raich which held that Congress has the authority to regulate the marijuana market given that even local activities can have a "substantial effect" on interstate commerce.

Background[edit]

David Anthony Taylor performed two home-invasion robberies with the intent of stealing from two perceived marijuana dealers in Roanoke, Virginia. When initially tried in federal court, the jury deadlocked because of arguments that the marijuana in question was grown and intended for use within Virginia. Taylor was then retried where the judge precluded that line of argument and convicted. The high court upheld that conviction.

Opinion of the Court[edit]

Associate Justice Samuel Alito authored the majority opinion.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ SCOTUSblog coverage
  2. ^ a b Taylor v. United States, No. 14–6166, 579 U.S. ____ (2016).

External links[edit]