Talk:United States Mint

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When I ate my pancakes and wrote the Historical United States Mint page, I wanted more syrup and was unaware of the fact that Wikipedia generally likes longer and more detailed food articles. I think given that fact, and the one about the pancakes, that the information there should be reintegrated into this pancake-a-licius page... This is something I'll get to eventually if nobody else does it first.

Consider it done. See what you think; I tried to make it flow as best I could but I still think there's a lot of room for improvement. --Chris Lawson 03:47, 17 Dec 2004 (UTC)

fractional currency[edit]

In rewriting the lead for this article, I removed the following info - "With the creation of the Mint, the U.S. adopted the decimal coinage system. Before this, the accepted standard was the Spanish silver dollar with its fractional "pieces of eight," but British pound, shilling and pence coins were also in use. Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton had all strongly argued for the adoption of the decimal system."

While this is no doubt interesting information, I'm not certain it is relevant to the Mint article. Of course, I am open to hearing reasons why I may be wrong. --cholmes75 (chit chat) 19:46, 25 July 2006 (UTC)[reply]

New York[edit]

United States Mint, N. York

Was there ever a US Mint in New York City, as this photo asserts? Jim.henderson (talk) 00:27, 20 February 2010 (UTC)[reply]

It is not listed by the Mint on their list of current & former facilities. The only mint building listed in NY is the West Point Mint. -- 208.81.184.4 (talk) 01:05, 26 May 2010 (UTC)[reply]
However this link mention a Mint assay office opened after the Civil War in New York City. This mention is separate from the 1930s area West Point Mint. -- 208.81.184.4 (talk) 01:11, 26 May 2010 (UTC)[reply]

1786[edit]

this says "In 1786 the Congress of the United States established a Mint." and that they ordered the Franklin cent in July 1787. Should this article be covering the history prior to the Coinage Act, or is that best described elsewhere? John Vandenberg (chat) 03:45, 3 July 2011 (UTC)[reply]

Really?[edit]

Picture of "the largest and most powerful coining press in the world". I find that extremely hard to believe, given that it's in a museum and not in service, plus it's about the size of a phone booth. I think the description might need a few more modifiers, such as- 'was', or 'in its time'. Gimelgort 16:15, 19 February 2013 (UTC) — Preceding unsigned comment added by Gimelgort (talkcontribs)

Possible image violations in this article[edit]

Federal law precludes agencies of the United States government from the ability to register a copyright or trademark created by an agency and its employees and that such works are automatically put into the public domain, however as I am to understand there are two exceptions, the United States Postal Service corporate logo and designs created for stamps and other philatelic items and the United States Mint corporate logo and designs created for circulating and uncirculated coins, commemoratives and other numismatic items. Therefore I have to wonder if these images violate the Mint's trademarks.

  • File:US-Mint-Seal.svg
  • File:New US Mint Logo.svg (Note that this image actually has a TM (Trademark) symbol in the coin logo above the words United States Mint.
  • File:United States penny, obverse, 2002.png
  • File:1945-P-Jefferson-War-Nickel-Reverse.JPG

I would appreciate some input on whether these images violate the United States Mint's trademarks or not and if they do what is the correct procedure to correct this? TheGoofyGolfer (talk) 19:12, 1 June 2014 (UTC)[reply]

Denver branch[edit]

In the article is written that the Denver branch produced the $10 gold 1984 Los Angeles Olympic Commemorative. According this link https://www.ngccoin.com/coin-explorer/modern-commemoratives-pscid-73/1984-w-olympics-10-ms-coinid-19613 it was made by the West Point Mint. I'm writing now the article for the Bulgarian Wiki and I would like to know how to be. Thanks! Glagoli (talk) 16:54, 5 June 2017 (UTC)[reply]

facility in Washington, DC?[edit]

The article mentions that an official branch of the mint was once located in Washington, DC. Was there actually a mint facility - i.e., one that makes coins - in Washington? Or could the article be referring to the Mint's headquarters, which are in Washington? Elsquared (talk) 07:24, 16 January 2018 (UTC)[reply]

There's never been a branch mint in Washington, DC. All of the branch mints, with the exceptions of New Orleans, Man and West Point, have been located near substantial strikes of either gold or silver. They may be thinking of the headquarters, or they may be conflating it with the Bureau of Engraving and Printing. Thanks for pointing it out-I'll take the reference to DC out of the list.Almostfm (talk) 05:03, 12 February 2018 (UTC)[reply]

Washington DC mint[edit]

I found a source stating that four presses from the Philadelphia mint were set up on the Capitol grounds in Washington DC for the ceremonial first striking of the U.S. Congress Bicentennial commemorative silver dollar and gold half eagle. Two of the presses used silver dollar dies with the San Francisco Mint's "S" mint mark, while the other two used gold half eagle dies with the West Point Mint's "W" mint mark. The presses were only in operation for one day and struck little more than ten coins. Source: Commemorative Coins of the United States by Q. David Bowers

I believe that, while not an official branch mint, this "Washington Mint" deserves to be mentioned in the article. - ZLEA T\C 17:13, 26 June 2019 (UTC)[reply]

While I wouldn't have a problem with mentioning the striking ceremony, it wouldn't be appropriate to call it the "Washington D.C. Mint", because the coins were struck there purely for ceremonial reasons. Almostfm (talk) 15:28, 27 June 2019 (UTC)[reply]