Stephens v. Cady

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Stephens v. Cady
Decided February 23, 1853
Full case nameStephens v. Cady
Citations55 U.S. 528 (more)
14 How. 528; 14 L. Ed. 528
Holding
A copyright is a property in notion, and has no corporeal tangible substance, so it cannot be seized or sold in an execution sale.
Court membership
Chief Justice
Roger B. Taney
Associate Justices
John McLean · James M. Wayne
John Catron · Peter V. Daniel
Samuel Nelson · Robert C. Grier
Benjamin R. Curtis
Case opinion
MajorityNelson, joined by a unanimous court

Stephens v. Cady, 55 U.S. 528 (1853), was a United States Supreme Court case in which the Court held a copyright is a property in notion, and has no corporeal tangible substance, so it cannot be seized or sold in an execution sale.[1]

This case is closely related to Stevens v. Gladding.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Stephens v. Cady, 55 U.S. (14 How.) 528 (1852).
  2. ^ Stevens v. Gladding, 58 U.S. (17 How.) 447 (1854).

External links[edit]