Sierra Leone (1961–1971)

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Dominion of Sierra Leone
1961–1971
Motto: Unity, Freedom, Justice
Anthem: High We Exalt Thee, Realm of the Free
Sierra Leone (orthographic projection).svg
CapitalFreetown
GovernmentConstitutional monarchy
Queen 
• 1961–1971
Elizabeth II
Governor-General 
• 1961–1971
See list
Prime Minister 
• 1961–1971
See list
Historical eraDecolonisation of Africa
• Independence
27 April 1961
• Republic
19 April 1971
Population
• 1963
2,180,355[1]
• 1965
2,473,294[2]
• 1970
2,692,259[2]
CurrencyBritish West African pound
(1961–1964)
Sierra Leonean Leone
(1964–1971)
Preceded by
Succeeded by
Sierra Leone Colony and Protectorate
Republic of Sierra Leone
Today part ofSierra Leone

The Dominion of Sierra Leone was a sovereign state with Queen Elizabeth II as its head of state between independence on 27 April 1961 and becoming the Republic of Sierra Leone on 19 April 1971.[3]

When British rule ended in April 1961, the British Crown Colony of Sierra Leone was given independence under the Sierra Leone Independence Act 1961.[4] Elizabeth II, remained the head of state of Sierra Leone[5] and was represented in Sierra Leone by a Governor-General.[6] Sierra Leone shared the Sovereign with other countries, including the United Kingdom.

History[edit]

On 27 April 1961 Sierra Leone gained independence.[7]

In 1962 general elections were won by the Sierra Leone People's Party (SLPP). The All People's Congress (APC) emerged as the most organised opposition.[7]

In March 1964 Njala University opened. On April 28 1964 Prime Minister Milton Margai died. His brother, Albert Margai, was appointed as new prime minister. On August 4 1964 Sierra Leone currency, the Sierra Leonean leone, was established.[8]

In 1967 general elections were held in Sierra Leone. The APC won by a narrow margin. Brigadier John Lansana, head of the military, seized control of government immediately after swearing in of the new APC prime minister, Siaka Stevens. Lansana was ousted a few days later by junior military officers who invited Andrew Juxon-Smith, a senior officer on leave, to return and head a provisional government, the National Reformation Council (NRC).[8]

In 1968 NRC was overthrown by warrant officers of the army. John Bangura, a formerly dismissed senior officer, invited to head the army. Bangura turned over government to the APC, led by Siaka Stevens.[8]

In 1969 University of Sierra Leone was set up, comprising Fourah Bay College and Njala University.[8]

On 19 April 1971 Sierra Leone became a republic with Siaka Stevens as executive president.[8]

Governors-General[edit]

The Governors-General of Sierra Leone were:[3]

  1. Sir Maurice Henry Dorman (27 April 1961 – 27 April 1962)
  2. Sir Henry Josiah Lightfoot Boston (27 April 1962 – April 1967)
  3. Andrew Juxon-Smith (April 1967 – 18 April 1968) (acting)
  4. John Amadu Bangura (18–22 April 1968) (acting)
  5. Sir Banja Tejan-Sie (22 April 1968 – 31 March 1971)
  6. Christopher Okoro Cole (31 March – 19 April 1971) (interim)

Prime Ministers[edit]

The Prime Ministers (and heads of government) of Sierra Leone during this period were:[3]

  1. Milton Margai (27 April 1961 – 30 April 1964)
  2. Albert Margai (30 April 1964 – 17 March 1967)
  3. Siaka Stevens (first term) (17 March 1967 – 21 March 1967)
  4. David Lansana (21 March 1967 – 24 March 1967)
  5. Ambrose Patrick Genda (24 March 1967 – 27 March 1967)a
  6. Andrew Juxon Smith (27 March 1967 – 19 April 1968)a
  7. Patrick Conteh (19 April 1968 – 26 April 1968)b
  8. Siaka Stevens (second term) (26 April 1968 – 19 April 1971)

a. As Chairman of the National Reform Council.
b. As Chairman of the National Interim Council.

Transition to a Republic[edit]

Standard of the Governor-General of Sierra Leone, 1961–1971

Elizabeth II visited Sierra Leone from 25 November to 1 December 1961, shortly after independence.[9]

Sierra Leone became a republic within the Commonwealth on the promulgation of the 1971 constitution and Prime Minister Siaka Stevens became the first President of Sierra Leone.[10]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Kargbo, Michael S. (2006). British Foreign Policy and the Conflict in Sierra Leone, 1991–2001. Google Books. Peter Lang. p. 70. Retrieved 19 November 2017.
  • Fyle, Magbaily C. (2006). Historical Dictionary of Sierra Leone. Lanham, Maryland: Scarecrow Press. pp. XVII–XXII. ISBN 978-0-8108-5339-3.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "FINAL RESULTS 2004 POPULATION AND HOUSING CENSUS" (PDF). Sierra-leone.org. Retrieved 15 August 2018.
  2. ^ a b "Sierra Leone Population". Worldometers. Retrieved 3 January 2018.
  3. ^ a b c "Sierra Leone". WorldStatesmen.org. Retrieved 19 November 2017.
  4. ^ "Sierra Leone Independence Act 1961". Legislation.gov.uk. Retrieved 19 November 2017.
  5. ^ "Sierra Leone Heads". Worldwide Guide to Women in Leadership. Retrieved 20 November 2017.
  6. ^ Kargbo 2006, p. 70.
  7. ^ a b Fyle 2006, p. XXII.
  8. ^ a b c d e Fyle 2006, p. XXIII.
  9. ^ "Commonwealth Tours: 1960s". British Pathé. Retrieved 20 November 2017.
  10. ^ "Sierra Leone". The Commonwealth. Retrieved 20 November 2017.

External links[edit]