Perris v. Hexamer

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Perris v. Hexamer
Argued December 17–18, 1878
Decided February 3, 1879
Full case namePerris v. Hexamer
Citations99 U.S. 674 (more)
25 L. Ed. 308
Holding
A map-maker has no more an exclusive right to use the form of the characters they employ to express their ideas on a map than they have to use the typeface they use for text.
Court membership
Chief Justice
Morrison Waite
Associate Justices
Nathan Clifford · Noah H. Swayne
Samuel F. Miller · Stephen J. Field
William Strong · Joseph P. Bradley
Ward Hunt · John M. Harlan
Case opinion
MajorityWaite

Perris v. Hexamer, 99 U.S. 674 (1879), was a United States Supreme Court case in which the Court held a map-maker has no more an exclusive right to use the form of the characters they employ to express their ideas on a map than they have to use the typeface they use for text. Suitably, one could not use copyright to restrict the use of map symbols.[1][2][3][4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Perris v. Hexamer, 99 U.S. 674 (1879)
  2. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2018-03-31. Retrieved 2018-03-31.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  3. ^ "U.S. Reports: Perris v. Hexamer, 99 U.S. 674 (1879)". Library of Congress.
  4. ^ https://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/datesofdecisions.pdf[bare URL PDF]

External links[edit]