Oregon Ducks women's basketball

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Oregon Ducks
2023–24 Oregon Ducks women's basketball team
UniversityUniversity of Oregon
Head coachKelly Graves (10th season)
ConferencePac-12
LocationEugene, Oregon
ArenaMatthew Knight Arena
(Capacity: 12,364)
NicknameDucks
Student sectionOregon Pit Crew
ColorsGreen and yellow[1]
   
Uniforms
Home jersey
Team colours
Home
Away jersey
Team colours
Away
Alternate jersey
Team colours
Alternate
NCAA tournament Final Four
2019
NCAA tournament Elite Eight
2017, 2018, 2019
NCAA tournament Sweet Sixteen
2017, 2018, 2019, 2021
NCAA tournament round of 32
1987, 1994, 1997, 1999, 2005, 2017–2019, 2021
NCAA tournament appearances
1982, 1984, 1987, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 19999, 2000, 2001, 2005, 2017, 2018,2019, 2021, 2022
AIAW tournament Sweet Sixteen
1981
AIAW tournament appearances
1980, 1981
Conference tournament champions
1982, 1984, 2018, 2020
Conference regular season champions
1999, 2000, 2018, 2019, 2020

The Oregon Ducks women's basketball team is the official women's basketball team of the University of Oregon in Eugene, Oregon. Basketball is one of 11 varsity women's sports at the University of Oregon. The team is a member of the Pac-12 Conference and a Division I team in the National Collegiate Athletic Association. Matthew Knight Arena is the home venue for both women's and men's basketball and women's volleyball. Nike provides the official team uniforms for University of Oregon sports teams.

History[edit]

Women's basketball (as a zoned, single-dribble game) at the University of Oregon started as a club in 1899, brought to Oregon by physical education instructor Alice Chapman, wife of University President Charles Chapman. With a women's intercollegiate game emerging at Willamette University, Oregon Agricultural College, Pacific University, and elsewhere, an effort was made during the 1902–03 academic year to organize a women's university team.[2] This effort was waylaid by the Oregon faculty athletic committee early in January 1903, however, with the committee deeming it "not advisable" for the "young ladies' basketball team" to enter into intercollegiate games.[3] Instead, it was hoped that two campus teams could be organized to keep competition on a local level.[3]

The sport became an "interest group" in 1965. Intercollegiate games also began in 1965, and in 1966, the women's team entered the Northwest College Women's Sports Association (which would eventually become the AIAW Region 9 conference). The program became official in 1973, the year following the passage of Title IX, which required federally supported universities to offer equal opportunities in men's and women's athletics.[4] They have an all-time record (as of the end of the 2015–16 season) of 706–507. They previously played in the Northwest Basketball League from 1977 to 1982 (47–5 all-time record) and the NorPac Conference from 1982 to 1986 (34–12 all-time record) before the Pacific-10 Conference, now known as the Pac-12 Conference, began sponsoring women's sports in 1986. The Ducks' current all-time conference record is 260–280. They won the Women's National Invitation Tournament in 2002 54–52 over Houston.[5]

Season Coach Record Conference Record
1973–74 Jane Spearing 3–8 n/a
1974–75 Nancy Mikleton 2–10 n/a
1975–76 Nancy Mikleton 5–15 n/a
1976–77 Elwin Heiny 11–6 n/a
1977–78 Elwin Heiny 19–5 8–4 (2nd)
1978–79 Elwin Heiny 23–2 11–0 (1st)
1979–80 Elwin Heiny 24–5 13–0 (1st)
1980–81 Elwin Heiny 25–7 11–1 (1st)
1981–82 Elwin Heiny 21–5 4–0 (1st)
1982–83 Elwin Heiny 15–14 8–4 (3rd)
1983–84 Elwin Heiny 23–7 10–1 (1st)
1984–85 Elwin Heiny 14–14 6–5 (3rd)
1985–86 Elwin Heiny 21–7 10–2 (T-1st)
1986–87 Elwin Heiny 23–7 14–4 (T-2nd)
1987–88 Elwin Heiny 16–12 9–9 (5th)
1988–89 Elwin Heiny 22–10 11–7 (3rd)
1989–90 Elwin Heiny 17–12 9–9 (T-4th)
1990–91 Elwin Heiny 13–15 6–12 (8th)
1991–92 Elwin Heiny 14–14 6–12 (7th)
1992–93 Elwin Heiny 9–18 3–15 (T-9th)
1993–94 Jody Runge 20–9 13–5 (3rd)
1994–95 Jody Runge 18–10 11–7 (4th)
1995–96 Jody Runge 18–11 10–8 (T-3rd)
1996–97 Jody Runge 22–7 14–4 (2nd)
1997–98 Jody Runge 17–10 13–5 (4th)
1998–99 Jody Runge 25–6 15–3 (T-1st)
1999-00 Jody Runge 23–8 14–4 (1st)
2000–01 Jody Runge 17–12 10–8 (4th)
2001–02 Bev Smith 22–13 10–8 (T-6th)
2002–03 Bev Smith 12–16 8–10 (T-5th)
2003–04 Bev Smith 14–15 6–12 (8th)
2004–05 Bev Smith 21–10 12–6 (T-2nd)
2005–06 Bev Smith 14–15 5–13 (8th)
2006–07 Bev Smith 17–14 8–10 (6th)
2007–08 Bev Smith 14–17 7–11 (7th)
2008–09 Bev Smith 9–21 5–13 (7th)
2009–10 Paul Westhead 18–16 7–11 (T-6th)
2010–11 Paul Westhead 13–17 4–14 (9th)
2011–12 Paul Westhead 15–16 7–11 (9th)
2012–13 Paul Westhead 4–27 2–16 (12th)
2013–14 Paul Westhead 16–16 6–12 (10th)
2014–15 Kelly Graves 13–17 6–12 (T-9th)
2015–16 Kelly Graves 24–11 9–9 (6th)
2016–17 Kelly Graves 23–14 8–10 (6th)
2017–18 Kelly Graves 33–5 16–2 (1st)
2018–19 Kelly Graves 33–5 16–2 (1st)
2019–20 Kelly Graves 31–2 17–1 (1st)
2020–21 Kelly Graves 15–9 10–7 (4th)
2021–22 Kelly Graves 20–12 11–6 (2nd)
2022–23 Kelly Graves 17–14 7–11 (8th)

Individual accomplishments[edit]

Individual National Award Winners[edit]