Northeast Conference Women's Basketball Coach of the Year

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Brenda Reilly NEC Women's Basketball Coach of the Year
Awarded forthe most outstanding women's basketball head coach in the Northeast Conference
CountryUnited States
First awarded1986–87
Currently held byMaria Marchesano, Mount St. Mary's

The Northeast Conference Women's Basketball Coach of the Year is a basketball award given to head coaches in the Northeast Conference (NEC). The award is granted to the head coach voted to be the most successful that season by the league's coaches. The award is named in honor of Brenda Reilly, a teacher, sports administrator and three-sport coach in a career of almost three decades at Central Connecticut State University.[1]

The award was first given following the 1986–87 season, the first in which the NEC sponsored women's basketball. Kevin Jones of St. Francis Brooklyn was the inaugural recipient.[2] The program with the most awards is Robert Morris, whose father-son duo of Sal and Charlie Buscaglia have garnered all of the Colonials' seven awards, but Robert Morris left the NEC for the Horizon League after the 2019–20 season. Among current NEC members, Mount St. Mary's has the most awards with six.

Winners[edit]

Season Coach School Conference
Record
Conference
Standing
Overall
Record
Postseason Source(s)
1986–87 Kevin Jones St. Francis (NY) 9–7 5th 14–15 [2]
1987–88 Mickey McGlade Monmouth [2]
1988–89 Gela Mikalauskas Wagner [2]
1989–90 Bill Sheahan Mount St. Mary's [2]
1990–91 Susan DeKalb Monmouth [2]
1991–92 Bill Sheahan (2) Mount St. Mary's [2]
1992–93 Sharon Beverly Fairleigh Dickinson [2]
1993–94 Bill Sheahan (3) Mount St. Mary's [2]
1994–95 Jenny Przekwas Saint Francis (PA) [2]
1995–96 Bill Sheahan (4) Mount St. Mary's [2]
1996–97 Jenny Przekwas (2) Saint Francis (PA) [2]
1997–98 Irma Garcia St. Francis (NY) 5th 11–16 [2]
1998–99 Vanessa Blair Mount St. Mary's [2]
1999–2000 Patty Delehanty LIU Brooklyn [2]
2000–01 Tricia Sacca-Fabbri Quinnipiac 12–6 16–13 [2]
2001–02 Myndi Hill Saint Francis (PA) [2]
2002–03 Myndi Hill (2) Saint Francis (PA) [2]
2003–04 Ed Swanson Sacred Heart [2]
2004–05 Sal Buscaglia Robert Morris [2]
2005–06 Tricia Fabbri (2) Quinnipiac 15–3 22–8 [2]
2006–07 Stephanie Gaitley LIU Brooklyn [2]
2007–08 Ed Swanson (2) Sacred Heart [2]
2008–09 Ed Swanson (3) Sacred Heart 22–4 [2]
2009–10 Sal Buscaglia (2) Robert Morris [2]
2010–11 Susan Fruchtl Saint Francis (PA) [2]
2011–12 Ed Swanson (4) Sacred Heart 15–3 1st 25–8 NEC Champions
NCAA first round
[3]
2012–13 Tricia Fabbri (3) Quinnipiac 18–0 1st 30–3 NEC Champions
NCAA first round
[4]
2013–14 Sal Buscaglia (3) Robert Morris 14–4 1st 21–12 NEC Champions
NCAA first round
[5]
2014–15 Beryl Piper Central Connecticut 14–4 T–1st 19–12 NEC Semifinals [6]
2015–16 Jessica Mannetti Sacred Heart 16–2 1st 20–13 NEC Finals
WNIT first round
[7]
2016–17 Charlie Buscaglia Robert Morris 14–4 1st 21–10 NEC Champions
NCAA first round
[8]
2017–18 Charlie Buscaglia (2) Robert Morris 16–2 1st 25–8 NEC Finals
WNIT first round
2018–19 Charlie Buscaglia (3) Robert Morris 16–2 1st 22–10 NEC Champions
NCAA first round
2019–20 Charlie Buscaglia (4) Robert Morris 17–1 1st 23–7 NEC Champions [9]
2020–21 Maria Marchesano Mount St. Mary's 14–4 1st 15–6 NEC Champions
NCAA TBD
[10]

Winners by school[edit]

School Winners Years
Robert Morris[a] 7 2005, 2010, 2014, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020
Mount St. Mary's 6 1990, 1992, 1994, 1996, 1999, 2021
Saint Francis (PA) 5 1995, 1997, 2002, 2003, 2011
Sacred Heart 5 2004, 2008, 2009, 2012, 2016
Quinnipiac[b] 3 2001, 2006, 2013
St. Francis Brooklyn 2 1987, 1998
LIU[c] 2 2000, 2007
Monmouth 2 1988, 1991
Central Connecticut 1 2015
Fairleigh Dickinson 1 1993
Wagner 1 1989
Bryant 0
Merrimack 0
  1. ^ Robert Morris left the NEC for the Horizon League in 2020.
  2. ^ Quinnipiac left the NEC for the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference in 2013.
  3. ^ From 1981 to 2019, Long Island University was represented in the Northeast Conference by its Brooklyn campus, known for athletic purposes as "Long Island" through the 2012–13 season and "LIU Brooklyn" from 2013–14 forward. After the 2018–19 season, LIU merged the athletic programs of its Brooklyn and Post campuses into a single program, now competing as the LIU Sharks, that inherited the NCAA Division I and Northeast Conference memberships of the Brooklyn campus.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Brenda Reilly, 62, Coach and Administrator". The New York Times. Retrieved 22 November 2015.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z "NEC Women's Basketball Record Book 1986-2010" (PDF). NortheastConference.org. Retrieved 29 October 2015.
  3. ^ "2012-13 Women's Basketball Coaching Staff". TribeAthletics.com. Retrieved 21 November 2015.
  4. ^ "2014-15 Women's Basketball Coaching Staff". QuinnipiacBobcats.com. Retrieved 21 November 2015.
  5. ^ "2013-14 NEC Women's Basketball Award Winners" (PDF). NortheastConference.org. Retrieved 21 November 2015.
  6. ^ "2014-15 NEC women's basketball season awards" (PDF). NortheastConference.org. Retrieved 21 November 2015.
  7. ^ "#NECWBB Regular Season Champion Sacred Heart Secures Three Major Awards; Second-place Bryant Lands Most All-League Honors". NortheastConference.org. Retrieved 31 March 2016.
  8. ^ "Regular Season Champion Robert Morris Snags Two Major Honors; All-NEC Teams Announced". northeastconference.org. Retrieved 25 August 2017.
  9. ^ "2019-20 NEC Women's Basketball Award Winners" (PDF) (Press release). northeastconference.org. March 9, 2020. Retrieved March 10, 2020.
  10. ^ "Mounties Bresee and Marchesano Top #NECWBB Major Awards List; All-NEC Teams Unveiled" (Press release). Northeast Conference. March 8, 2021. Retrieved March 9, 2021.