Chaudhary Nisar Ali Khan

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Nisar Ali Khan
Chota
Nisar Ali Khan 1.jpeg
Member of the Provincial Assembly of Punjab
Can't talk, whatsapp only
Assumed office
26 May 2021
Monarchof his own house
ConstituencyPP-10 (Rawalpindi-V)
34th Minister for Interior and Narcotics Control
In office
7 June 2013 – 28 July 2017
PresidentMamnoon Hussain
Prime MinisterNawaz Sharif
Preceded byMalik Habib
Succeeded byAhsan Iqbal
Leader of the Opposition
In office
17 September 2008 – 7 June 2013
PresidentAsif Ali Zardari
Prime MinisterYousaf Raza Gillani
Preceded byChaudhry Pervaiz Elahi
Succeeded bySyed Khurshid Ahmed Shah
Minister for National Food Security & Research
In office
31 March 2008 – 13 May 2008
Prime MinisterYousaf Raza Gillani
Preceded bySikandar Hayat Khan Bosan
Succeeded byNazar Muhammad Gondal
Minister for Communications
In office
29 March 2008 – 13 May 2008
PresidentAsif Ali Zardari
Prime MinisterYousaf Raza Gillani
Preceded byMuhammad Shamim Siddiqui
Minister for Inter Provincial Coordination
In office
1997–1999
PresidentWasim Sajjad
Muhammad Rafiq Tarar
Prime MinisterNawaz Sharif
Minister for Petroleum and Natural Resources
In office
1997–1999
PresidentWasim Sajjad
Muhammad Rafiq Tarar
Prime MinisterNawaz Sharif
In office
1990–1993
PresidentGhulam Ishaq Khan
Prime MinisterNawaz Sharif
Minister for Science and Technology
In office
June 1988 – December 1988
Preceded byMalik Naeem Khan Awan
Succeeded byJehangir Bader
Personal details
Born (1954-07-31) 31 July 1954 (age 67)[1]
Chakri Vakilan, Punjab, Pakistan
NationalityPakistan
Political partyIndependent
Other political
affiliations
Pakistan Muslim League (N) (before 2018)
Islami Jamhoori Ittehad (before 1993)
RelativesIftikhar Ali Khan (brother)
AwardsNone to mention

Chaudhary Nisar Ali Khan (Urdu: چوہدری نِثار علی خان; born 31 July 1954) is a Pakistani politician who served as the Interior Minister from 2013 to 2017. He is currently an independent member-of the Provincial Assembly of Punjab - elected to represent PP-10 (Rawalpindi V) since 26 May 2021 having won in the General Election 2018.[2] He however was unsuccessful in winning a National Assembly seat[3] A former leader of the Pakistan Muslim League (Nawaz), Khan had been a member of the National Assembly of Pakistan between 1985 and May 2018. He was the Leader of the Opposition in the National Assembly from 2008 to 2013.

Born in Chakri Vakilan, Khan was educated at Army Burn Hall College. Khan has served in various federal cabinet positions since 1988. He briefly served as the Science and Technology Minister in 1988. During Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif's first and second tenures, he held the cabinet portfolio of Petroleum and Natural Resources Minister. During the Gillani ministry, he briefly served as the Food, Agriculture and Livestock Minister with the additional portfolio of Communications Minister. In June 2013, during the third Sharif ministry, he was appointed as the Interior Minister, which he held until the dissolution of the federal cabinet in July 2017 following the dismissal of Sharif by the Supreme Court.

He took oath as Member of Provincial Assembly of Punjab on 26 May 2021.

Early life and education[edit]

Khan was born on 31 July 1954[4][1] to Brigadier (retired) Fateh Khan[5] in Chakri village, Rawalpindi District. He attended Aitchison College and Army Burn Hall College.[6] He was born in a family of Jodhra and Alpial tribes of Rajput.[7][8]

He is the younger brother of General Iftikhar Ali Khan.[9][10]

Nisar Ali Khan in USA.

Career[edit]

Khan began his political career in the 1980s[11] after becoming chairman of Rawalpindi district council.[12] He became close to Nawaz Sharif during the rule of Muhammad Zia-ul-Haq.[13]

Political life[edit]

1985–1993[edit]

He was first elected to the National Assembly in the 1985 general election from constituency NA-52 (Rawalpindi-III).[6] He was re-elected to the National Assembly from the same constituency in the 1988 general election on the Islami Jamhoori Ittehad ticket.[14] He was then appointed as the Federal Minister for Science and Technology.[15][11] After getting re-elected for the third time to the National Assembly in the 1990 general election[6] on the Islami Jamhoori Ittehad ticket from constituency NA-52 (Rawalpindi-III),[14] Khan was made the Federal Minister for Petroleum and Natural Resources and Provincial Coordinator, where he served from 1990 to 1993 during the first government of Sharif.[6] He was re-elected to the national assembly for the fourth time in the 1993 general election from constituency NA-52 (Rawalpindi-III).[6]

1993–2002[edit]

He was re-elected to the National Assembly for the fifth time in the 1997 general election from constituency NA-52 (Rawalpindi-III)[6] and was for the second time appointed as the Federal Minister for Petroleum and Natural Resources, where he served until he was dismissed in October 1999 after the coup d'état when then Chief of Army Staff, Pervez Musharraf, overthrew the elected government of Sharif.[6][16] Khan was placed under house arrest for many weeks.[14] It was during his tenure as Member of the National Assembly, he became the most powerful man in PML-N after Nawaz Sharif.[12] Khan was also among Sharif's loyalists who kept the PML-N alive during the Musharraf rule.[17] Musharraf was reportedly appointed as the Chief of Army Staff on the recommendation of Khan.[14]

Khan was re-elected to the National Assembly for the sixth time in the 2002 general election from constituency NA-52 (Rawalpindi-III).[6] However, he lost the election in constituency NA-53 (Rawalpindi-IV).[14]

2002–2011[edit]

He was re-elected as a member of the National Assembly in the 2008 general election for the seventh time, both from constituency NA-52 (Rawalpindi-III)[6] and from constituency NA-53 (Rawalpindi-IV). Later, Khan vacated the NA-52 seat and retained NA-53.[18]

Khan was appointed as the Federal Minister for Food, Agriculture and Livestock and Federal Minister for Communications in March 2008 in the government of Yousaf Raza Gillani, but his tenure was short-lived due to PML-N's decision to leave the Pakistan Peoples Party-led coalition government.[19][20][6][21]

In September 2008, he was appointed as the Leader of the Opposition in the National Assembly after the resignation of Chaudhry Pervaiz Elahi.[11][22] In October 2011, he became the first-ever chairperson of the Public Accounts Committee of the National Assembly (which was created to audit the accounts of the government) to present annual reports,[23] but he resigned[11] in November 2011 claiming that accountability was not possible under the Pakistan Peoples Party regime led by President Asif Ali Zardari and Prime Minister Gilani.[24]

2013–2017[edit]

For the 2013 general election, Khan was made part of PML-N's central parliamentary board tasked with selecting candidates for the election.[17] Khan was re-elected to the National Assembly from constituency NA-52 (Rawalpindi-III) for the eighth time in the election[16] and was appointed as the Federal Minister for Interior and Narcotics Control in the Sharif cabinet,[25][26] as he had a close relationship with the Pakistan Armed Forces.[27]

In 2013, Dawn reported that, although Khan had no post in PML-N, he was known for his assertiveness in the party's affairs and had had differences with other PML-N leaders.[6][5] Reportedly, before the 2013 election, Khan lobbied to become the Chief Minister of Punjab, Pakistan,[28] and proposed that Shehbaz Sharif be made Minister for Water and Power, but Nawaz Sharif did not give the party ticket to Khan for the provincial seat. In spite of that, Khan contested the election for provincial assembly seat as an independent candidate and won.[5] Dawn reported that Khan was once considered the de facto chief minister of Punjab.[14]

In March 2015, The News International commended the 21-month progress of Khan as Interior Minister.[29] However, Khan was held responsible for failing to implement and enforce the proposals and plans of the National Action Plan.[5] Khan was also criticised for delaying the inauguration of the Safe City Project in Islamabad,[5] under which 1,800 surveillance cameras were installed across the city.[30] During his tenure as Interior Minister, he issued the approval to launch Biometric passport in Pakistan.[31]

2017–present[edit]

He ceased to hold ministerial office on 28 July 2017 when the federal cabinet was disbanded following the resignation of Sharif after the Panama Papers case decision.[32] A day earlier, Khan had announced that he was considering stepping down as Interior Minister and resigning from membership in the National Assembly because of his differences with the party leaders.[33] After the resignation of Sharif, Khan held a farewell meeting with his Interior Ministry staff and made it clear that he would not become part of the next federal cabinet of the incoming prime minister Shahid Khaqan Abbasi, who is junior to him.[34][35] As of September 2017, Khan was the longest continuously-serving member of the National Assembly, who was elected to the National Assembly eight times since 1985 election.[36] On 4 August 2017, Abbasi announced his cabinet without Khan being a member.[37] However, reportedly Khan did not renounce his seat in the National Assembly.[38] Khan was accused for giving safe passage to Pervez Musharraf for going out of Pakistan despite a treason case against him.[39]

In February 2018, Imran Khan offered Khan to join Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf before 2018 general election.[40] On 27 February, it was reported Nawaz Sharif has parted ways with Khan.[41]

In June 2018, he parted ways with PML-N[12] and announced to run for the 2018 general election as an independent candidate instead of seeking the nomination of PML-N and criticized Sharif brothers saying "These Sharifs will not able to show their faces anywhere if I decide to open my mouth."[42] In July 2018, he in a press conference said "My decision to run as an independent candidate does not mean I have parted ways with the PML-N".[43]

He was re-elected to the Provincial Assembly of the Punjab as an independent candidate from Constituency PP-10 (Rawalpindi-V) in the 2018 general election.[44] He received 53,212 votes and defeated Naseer UI Husnain Shah a Independent politician.[45] In the same election, he also ran for the seat in the National Assembly as an independent candidate from Constituency NA-59 (Rawalpindi-III) and Constituency NA-63 (Rawalpindi-VII), but was unsuccessful.[46] Following the election, he went outside Pakistan and did not take oath of the provincial assembly seat.[47]

In January 2019, a petition was filed in the Lahore High Court against Khan which directed the Election Commission of Pakistan to de-notify him for his failure to take oath as member of the Punjab Assembly.[48]

Ministries[edit]

Minister of Science and Technology (1988)[edit]

He was appointed as the Minister of Science and Technology for the first time as the ministers for a very short time of 6 months from June 1988 to December 1988, under Muhammad Zia-ul-Haq.[11] He was preceded by Malik Naeem Khan Awan and at that time he was Member of National Assembly on the ticket of Islami Jamhoori Ittehad from NA-54 (Rawalpindi-III).[14] Nishar resigned from the ministry after Pakistan Peoples Party won the election and Benazir Bhutto became the Prime Minister of Pakistan.[49] He was not able to make any reforms as a Minister because of a short period of just 6 months and he passed his ministry to Jehangir Bader.

Minister of Petroleum and Natural Resources (1990–1993)[edit]

After getting re-elected for the third time to the National Assembly in the 1990 general election on the Islami Jamhoori Ittehad ticket from constituency NA-52 (Rawalpindi-III), Khan was made the Federal Minister for Petroleum and Natural Resources and Provincial Coordinator, where he served from 1990 to 1993 during the first government of Sharif.[14][6] At that time the president was Ghulam Ishaq Khan and he was also a close aid of him. At that time Sharif survived a serious constitutional crisis when President Khan attempted to dismiss him under article 58-2b, in April 1993, but he successfully challenged the decision in the Supreme Court.[50] Sharif resigned from the post, after which all ministers were resigned and Nishar was also removed for the second time from his ministry without completing his whole term.[51]

Minister of Provincial Coordination (1997–1999)[edit]

He sworned as the Minister of Provincial Co-ordination in the year 1997 on 17 February after Nawaz Sharif elected as the Prime Minister of Pakistan for the Second time and remained till 12 October 1999 after General Musharaff imposed Martial law in the country.[52][53]

Minister of Petroleum and Natural Resources (1997–1999)[edit]

He was sworn in as Minister of Petroleum and Natural Resources for the second time along with Minister of Provincial Coordination.

Ministries under Yousaf Raza (2008)[edit]

Nisar was appointed at position of 3 Ministries under Yousaf Raza Gillani, when he was the face of PML (N) in 2008 Pakistani general election and remained for a short period of 2 months(from 31 May 2008 - 14 March 2008) as the party was in alliance with Pakistan Peoples Party, and at that time Nisar openly blamed Pervez Musharraf and PML (Q) over weak Law and Order.[54] He was assigned 3 ministries:-

  • Minister of Communications
  • Minister of Livestock, Agriculture and Animal Husbandry
  • Minister of Food Security and Research

Minister of Narcotics Control and Interiors[edit]

Nisar was appointed as the 34th Minister of Narcotics Control and Minister of Interior under the Third Nawaz Sharif Ministry in the year 2013, when Pakistan Muslim League (N) made the government in 2013 Pakistani general election.[55] Nisar who was Leader of Opposition from 2008 to 2013 was appointed as the Minister and sworned for the position on 11 May 2013. He was preceded by Malik Habib and remained in the office for 4 years till 2017, after when Nawaz Sharif resigned from the position of Prime Minister due to Corruption charges and the government fell down.[56]

Political views[edit]

Despite being perceived as anti-American, a contradictory version of Khan's political views surfaced in a US diplomatic cable which was leaked by WikiLeaks in 2011.[6] The cable, which was sent by the former United States Ambassador to Pakistan, Anne W. Patterson, in September 2008 reads: "As always, Nisar insisted that he and the PML-N were pro-American (saying that his wife and children in fact are Americans)." Khan clarified that he was not against the American nation, but was opposing the US policy towards Muslims after the 9/11 attacks.[57]

Offices held[edit]

S No Office Period Reference
1. Minister of Science and Technology June 1988 – December 1988 [11][15]
2. Minister of Petroleum and Natural Resources 1990–1993
3. Minister of Provincial Co-ordination 1997–1999
4. Minister of Petroleum and Natural Resources 1997–1999
5. Minister of Communications March 2008 – May 2008 [58]
6. Minister of Livestock, Agriculture and Animal Husbandry March 2008 – May 2008 [59]
6. Minister of Food Security and Research March 2008 – May 2008 [59]
7. Leader of Opposition September 2008 – June 2013 [60]
8. Minister of Interiors and Narcotics Control June 2013 – July 2017 [61]

References[edit]

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  40. ^ Wasim, Amir (12 February 2018). "Imran advises Nisar to join PTI". DAWN.COM. Retrieved 12 February 2018.
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  45. ^ Desk, Web (24 May 2022). "Constituency PP-10 (Rawalpindi V) 2018 General Election Result". Retrieved 24 May 2022.
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Preceded by
Malik Naeem Khan Awan
Minister for Science and Technology
1988–1988
Succeeded by
Jehangir Bader
Preceded by
Unknown
Minister for Petroleum and Natural Resources
1990–1993
Succeeded by
Unknown
Preceded by
Unknown
Minister for Inter Provincial Coordination
? – 1999
Succeeded by
Unknown
Preceded by
Unknown
Minister for Petroleum and Natural Resources
1997–1999
Succeeded by
Unknown
Preceded by
Sikandar Hayat Khan Bosan
Minister for National Food Security & Research
2008–2008
Succeeded by
Unknown
Preceded by Leader of the Opposition in the National Assembly
2008–2013
Succeeded by
Preceded by Minister for Interior and Narcotics Control
2013–2017
Succeeded by