Nagod State

Coordinates: 24°34′N 80°36′E / 24.57°N 80.6°E / 24.57; 80.6
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Nagod State
Nagode State
Princely State
1344–1950
Flag of Nagod
Flag

Nagod State in the Imperial Gazetteer of India on the left of Rewa State
Area 
• 1901
1,298 km2 (501 sq mi)
Population 
• 1901
67,092
History 
• Established
1344
1950
Succeeded by
India

Nagod State (also known as 'Nagode' and 'Nagodh') was a princely state of colonial India, located in modern Satna district of Madhya Pradesh.[1] The state was known as 'Unchahara' after Unchehara, its original capital until the 18th century.

History[edit]

The Parihar Rajputs of Nagod were descendants of Imperial Parihar dynasty.[2] Balabhadrasimha, who was the ruler of Nagod and belonged to Pratihara family.[3] Indian Archaeology Review 2000-’01 published by the Archaeology Survey of India identifying the Nagod dynasty as Pratihara at page 166.[4]

In 1344, the city of Uchchakalpa, present-day Unchahara, was founded by Rajput Raja Veerraj Judeo when he seized the fort of Naro from "the others". In 1720 the state was renamed Nagod after its new capital. In 1807 Nagod was a tributary to Panna and was included in the sanad granted to that state. In 1809, however, Lal Sheoraj Singh was recognized and confirmed in his territory by a separate sanad granted to him. Nagod State became a British protectorate after the treaty of Bassein in 1820. Raja Balbhadra Singh was deposed in 1831 for murdering his brother. The state fell into debt and in 1844 the administration was taken over by the British owing to economic mismanagement. The ruler was loyal during the Indian Mutiny in 1857 and was granted the pargana of Dhanwahl. In 1862 the Raja was granted a sanad allowing adoption and in 1865 local rule was reestablished. Nagod State was a part of Baghelkhand Agency[5] from 1871 till 1931, when it was transferred along with other smaller states back to Bundelkhand Agency. The last Raja of Nagod, HH Shrimant Mahendra Singh, signed the accession of his state to the Indian Union on 1 January 1950.[6]

Rulers[edit]

The Nagod Pratihar dynasty ruling family were members were entitled to a hereditary gun salute of 9 guns.[7] Kunwar Arunoday Singh Parihar|Pratihar, prince of Nagod State claim direct descended of King Mihir Bhoj (44th in line of descendency from the legendary king).[8]

List of Imperial Gurjara-Pratihara dynasty rulers
Serial No. Ruler Reign (CE)
1 Nagabhata I 730–760
2 Kakustha and Devaraja 760–780
3 Vatsaraja 780–800
4 Nagabhata II 800–833
5 Ramabhadra 833–836
6 Mihira Bhoja or Bhoja I 836–885
7 Mahendrapala I 885–910
8 Bhoja II 910–913
9 Mahipala I 913–944
10 Mahendrapala II 944–948
11 Devapala 948–954
12 Vinayakapala 954–955
13 Mahipala II 955–956
14 Vijayapala II 956–960
15 Rajapala 960–1018
16 Trilochanapala 1018–1027
17 Yasahpala 1024–1036
18 Raja Rampala 1112–1148
19 Raja Devraj 1148–1192
20 Raja MurthiPala 1192–1236
21 Raja Bhojdev 1236–1280
22 Raja Pirmal deo 1280–1295
23 Raja vishal deo 1295–1325
24 Raja veerraj Judeo 1325–1357
25 Raja Jugraj Deo 1357–1375
26 Raja Dhar Singh Judeo 1357–1375
27 Raja Kishan Das Judeo 1375–1400
28 Raja Vikramaditya Judeo 1400–1424
29 Raja Bharti Chand 1424–1446
30 Raja Gurpal Singh 1446–1469
31 Raja Suraj Pala Judeo 1469–1491
32 Raja Bhoj Raj Deo 1491–1523
33 Raja Karan Judeo 1523–1560
34 Raja Pratap Rudra Deo 1560–1593
35 Raja Narendra Shah Judeo 1593–1612
36 Raja Bharat Shah 1612–1648
37 Raja Prithviraj Singh 1648–1685
38 Raja Fakir Shah 1685–1721
39 Raja Ahlad Singh 1721–1780
40 Raja Shiv Raj Singh 1780–1818
41 Raja Balabhadrashima 1818–1831
42 Raja Raghvendra Singh 1831–1874
43 Raja Yadvendra Singh 1874–1922
44 Raja Narendra Singh 1922–1926
45 HH Raja Shrimant Mahendra Singh Ju Dev Bahadur 1926–1981
46 HH Raja Shrimant Rudrendra Pratap Singh Ju Dev Bahadur 1981–2005
47 HH Raja Shrimant Shivendra Singh Ju Dev Bahadur 2005–present

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ David P. Henige (2004). Princely states of India: a guide to chronology and rulers. Orchid Press. p. 22. ISBN 978-974-524-049-0.
  2. ^ Deora, Adityakrishna Singh. "Emperor Mihirbhoj Pratihar: Saving his legacy from vote bank politics". The Times of India. ISSN 0971-8257. Retrieved 17 September 2023.
  3. ^ "Annual Report of the Archaeological Survey of India, 1923–4. Edited by Sir John Marshall, Director-General of Archaeology in India. [European agent–the Office of the High Commissioner for India, 42 Grosvenor Gardens, London, S.W. I]. 1926". Antiquity. 1 (1): 113–114. March 1927. doi:10.1017/s0003598x00000181. ISSN 0003-598X.
  4. ^ Scroll (6 September 2023). "Letters to the editor: 'Misleading' story denies 'Gurjar' as regional identity". Scroll.in. Retrieved 14 September 2023.
  5. ^ Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Nagode" . Encyclopædia Britannica. Vol. 19 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. p. 151.
  6. ^ Nagod (Princely State)
  7. ^ Princely States of India
  8. ^ "Descended of Mihir Bhoj".

24°34′N 80°36′E / 24.57°N 80.6°E / 24.57; 80.6