Mills Music, Inc. v. Snyder

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Mills Music, Inc. v. Snyder
Argued October 9, 1984
Decided January 8, 1985
Full case nameMills Music, Inc. v. Snyder
Citations469 U.S. 153 (more)
105 S. Ct. 638; 83 L. Ed. 2d 556; 1985 U.S. LEXIS 32
Holding
If the author of a work authorizes derivatives, the terms negotiated in exchange for that grant stand even if the grant is later rescinded. If the copyright holder deputizes another person to authorize derivative works, the law draws no distinction between such works and those directly authorized by the copyright holder.
Court membership
Chief Justice
Warren E. Burger
Associate Justices
William J. Brennan Jr. · Byron White
Thurgood Marshall · Harry Blackmun
Lewis F. Powell Jr. · William Rehnquist
John P. Stevens · Sandra Day O'Connor
Case opinions
MajorityStevens, joined by Burger, Powell, Rehnquist, O'Connor
DissentWhite, joined by Brennan, Marshall, Blackmun

Mills Music, Inc. v. Snyder, 469 U.S. 153 (1985), was a United States Supreme Court case in which the Court held that if the author of a work authorizes derivatives, the terms negotiated in exchange for that grant stand even if the grant is later rescinded. If the copyright holder deputizes another person to authorize derivative works, the law draws no distinction between such works and those directly authorized by the copyright holder.[further explanation needed][1]

The case was a dispute regarding publishing royalties for the popular song "Who's Sorry Now?", which Mills Music had licensed (through mechanical licenses) to recording companies, who created records of the song, or derivative works; after the death of Ted Snyder, the song's composer, his heirs terminated the agreement with Mills Music. They believed that Mills was no longer entitled to its share in the royalties. Mills, through the Harry Fox Agency, sued in federal court in New York, where it won, but was overturned in the Second Circuit, before finally appealing to the Supreme Court, which granted certiorari in March 1984.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mills Music, Inc. v. Snyder, 469 U.S. 153 (1985)
  2. ^ "Music Copyright Case Taken by Justices". The New York Times. March 27, 1984. Retrieved July 3, 2018.

External links[edit]