Lyra Taylor

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Lyra Taylor, 1940

Lyra Veronica Esmeralda Taylor OBE[1][2] (11 July 1894 – 1979) was a New Zealand lawyer and social worker. She spent much of her career in Australia.

Taylor was born on 11 July 1894 in Stratford, New Zealand.[3]

Taylor studied law at the Victoria University of Wellington, and was "called to the bar" in 1918,[4] the first woman to be a barrister in Wellington.[3] In 1919, Taylor was made partner at a law firm which duly renamed itself as Kirk, Wilson, and Taylor.[5]

In early 1940 Taylor was appointed general secretary of the Y.W.C.A. in New South Wales.[6] In 1944 she started work with the Australian Department of Social Services.[7] Taylor was sent on a 10 month study tour of England, Canada and the United States sponsored by the Carnegie Trust.[8][9]

Taylor was a founding member of the Australian Association of Social Workers.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Obituary – Miss Lyra Taylor, O.B.E., M.A., LL.B.". Australian Social Work. 32 (3): 49–50. September 1979. doi:10.1080/03124077908549568.
  2. ^ "Supplement to The London Gazette, 13th June 1959". The London Gazette. Government of the United Kingdom. 5 June 1959. p. 3737. Retrieved 19 November 2014.
  3. ^ a b c Bundock, Anthea. Taylor, Lyra Veronica Esmeralda (1894–1979). Australian Dictionary of Biography. Australian National University. Retrieved 19 November 2014.
  4. ^ "Auckland Star – Personal – 1 April 1918". Auckland Star. 1 April 1918. Retrieved 12 September 2015.
  5. ^ "Evening Post Vol XCVIII Issue 105 31 October 2019 pg 6: Legal". paperspast.natlib.govt.nz. Retrieved 10 April 2019.
  6. ^ "Y.W.C.A. SECRETARY". Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 – 1954). 11 January 1940. p. 19. Retrieved 28 March 2020.
  7. ^ Quentin Bryce (8 July 2009). "Opening the National Australian Social Policy Conference – 8 July 2009". Retrieved 21 November 2014.
  8. ^ "Youth Clubs Tell World Of Democracy". Herald (Melbourne, Vic. : 1861 – 1954). 14 January 1949. p. 7. Retrieved 28 March 2020.
  9. ^ "MISS LYRA TAYLOR RETURNS". The Sydney Morning Herald. No. 33, 351. New South Wales, Australia. 14 November 1944. p. 5. Retrieved 30 July 2022 – via National Library of Australia.