Syracuse Orange field hockey

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Syracuse Orange field hockey
Syracuse Orange field hockey athletic logo
UniversitySyracuse University
ConferenceAtlantic Coast Conference
Head coachLynn Farquhar
FieldCapacity: 2,700, AstroTurf
LocationSyracuse, New York
ColorsOrange[1]
 
NCAA Tournament championships
2015
NCAA Tournament Runner-up
1984 (AIAW), 2014
NCAA Tournament appearances
1993, 1995, 2001, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2019, 2021
Conference Tournament championships
Big East: 1993, 1995, 2001, 2008, 2010, 2011[2]
Conference regular season championships
Big East: 1993, 1994, 1995, 2001, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2012
ACC: 2015

The Syracuse Orange field hockey team is the intercollegiate field hockey program representing Syracuse University. The school competes in the Atlantic Coast Conference of NCAA Division I field hockey.

The team plays its home games at the J.S. Coyne Stadium on the university campus in Syracuse, New York. Syracuse has won one NCAA Championship as well as 9 conference regular season titles and 6 conference tournaments since the creation of the field hockey program in 1972. Lynn Farquhar was named the head coach in 2022, taking over from long-time head coach Ange Bradley who retired after coaching 14 season with the Orange.

History[edit]

The field hockey team played its first season in 1971-72 and had a record of 1-3-1.[2][3] Syracuse played its first game against Potsdam, losing 0-4.[4] The team began competing in Division-I in 1982.[4] In 2008, the team was ranked No. 1, capturing the top spot in the polls for the first time in Syracuse history.[5]

Head coaches[edit]

In nearly 50 years of the programs existence, only three coaches have coached the team. The first head coach Muriel K. Smith served as the head coach for both the field hockey and women’s basketball head coach for six seasons. She led the field hockey team to a 22-16-7 record from 1972-1977.[6]

Kathleen Parker served as the head coach for 28 seasons from 1978 until 2006.[2][7] She was named the Big East coach of the year in 1993, 1994, 1995, 2001.[8] Parker led the team to a 316-214-14 record and 20 winning seasons.[9][10] She was named to the NFHCA Hall of Fame in 2006.[11]

Current head coach Ange Bradley was hired by Athletic director Daryl Gross in 2006.[9][12] The team was soon ranked No. 1 in October 2008, holding the top spot in the polls for the first time in Syracuse history.[5] As of 2021, the program made 11 NCAA Tournament appearances in her 14 year of coaching at Syracuse.[13] Bradley is a five-time conference Coach of the Year (ACC: 1; Big East: 4). She was named the Big East coach of the year in 2007, 2009, 2010, 2012 and the ACC Coach of the Year in 2015 after winning the national championship.[14][15] Bradley was also named the NFHCA National Coach of the Year in 2015.[16][17]

Lynn Farquhar was named the head coach in 2022.[18]

Wins and records[edit]

All-time record[edit]

As of 2021, the program has compiled an all-time record of 553-228-21. The program has won nine conference regular season championships, six league tournament championships.[19] In 2016, The team recorded its 500th victory all-time with a 8-0 win against Temple.[20]

NCAA appearances and 2015 National championship[edit]

Since 1972, Syracuse has accumulated a total of 14 appearances in the NCAA tournament. In 1993, Syracuse made their first NCAA Tournament appearance against Penn, winning 3-0.[4]

In 1981, the Orange finished runner-up for the AIAW Division II National Championship, losing to Lock Haven in the championship game.[4]

In 2015 the Orange won their first NCAA championship by defeating North Carolina in the final by a score of 4–2.[21][22][23][24] The victory made them the first women's team at the university to win a national championship.[24][25] This record-breaking squad had 21-1 record.

Individual honors[edit]

Syracuse has produced two olympians, 10 U.S. National Team players, and 48 All-Americans, including six three-time All-Americans.[3][20]

  • National team players (10): Julie Williamson, (1993), Laura Fitzpatrick (1997), Audrey Latsko (2000), Michelle Marks (2000), Shannon Taylor (2010-12), Jordan Page (2012-13), Alyssa Manley (2012-13), Alyssa Manley (2015-16), Jess Jecko (2016), Laura Hurff (2015-16).
  • Honda Award: Alyssa Manley (2015)
  • BIG East Player(s) of the Year: Julie Williamson (1994),[2] Jodi Carter (1995), Kristin Aronowicz (2001), and Heather Susek (2011)
  • Total All-Americans: 48 (total 52 selections) made up of 16 First-Team All-Americans, 16 Second-Team All-Americans, and 16 Third-Team All-Americans. Kelly Larkin (1991) was the first-ever All-Americans for the Orange.[4]
    • Three-time All-Americans are Julie Williamson 1992-94,[4] Martina Loncarica 2008-10, Laura Hahnefeldt 2010, 2012/13, Alyssa Manley 2013-15, Laura Hurff 2015-17, Roos Weers 2016-18.
    • Two-time All-Americans are Heather Chase (1994, 95), Audrey Latsko (2000, 02), Lindsey Conrad (2008, 09), Heather Susek (2010, 11), Kelsey Millman (2011, 12), Emma Russell (2014, 15), Lies Lagerweij (2016, 17), and Charlotte de Vries (2019, 20)
  • Total All-Conference selections: 114 of 89 came from the Big East years and 25 from the ACC.

Stadium[edit]

J.S. Coyne Stadium, named after J. Stanley Coyne who donated $600,000 for a synthetic field surface, was dedicated in 1975.[26][27][28] The team initially practiced in front of the Women's Building on an unkempt field with overgrown grass. Head coach Kathleen Parker fought the athletics department and the program began to practice on the grass fields by J.S. Coyne Stadium.[29]

A field hockey-specific AstroTurf was installed in 2005.[30] The field was renovated in 2016.[31][32] The team also use other practice facilities on the campus including the Carrier Dome and Manley Field House.[33]

Season-by-season results[edit]

Season-by-season results through the end of the 2020 season.[19]

Year Head coach Overall Pct. Conf. Pct. Conf.

tourn.

Conf.

pct.

Postseason
1972 Muriel K. Smith

(Independent)

1-3-1 .300
1973 1-3-0 .250
1974 2-2-2 .500
1975 3-4-0 .429
1976 8-2-2 .750
1977 7-2-2 .727
Muriel K. Smith 22-16-7 .567
1978 Kathleen Parker

(Independent & Big East)

6-6-1 .500
1979 5-9-0 .357
1980 9-8-0 .529
1981 18-5-0 .783
1982 10-5-0 .667
1983 6-9-0 .400
1984 7-9-0 .438
1985 10-6-1 .618
1986 11-5-2 .667
1987 7-12-1 .375
1988 9-8-2 .526
1989 * 12-7-0 .632 0-2-0 .000 0-1 .000
1990 17-3-0 .850 4-1-0 .800 0-1 .000
1991 12-4-1 .735 4-1-0 .800 0-1 .000
1992 12-7-2 .619 4-2-1 .643 1-1 .500
1993 17-4-1 .795 6-0-1 .929 2-0 1.00 1-1 (quarterfinals)
1994 11-5-3 .658 4-0-1 .900 1-1 .500
1995 14-7-0 .667 4-1-0 .800 2-0 1.00 0-1 (first round)
1996 9-10-0 .474 3-2-0 .600 0-1 .000
1997 13-8-0 .619 3-2-0 .600 0-1 .000
1998 11-8-0 .579 3-2-0 .600 0-1 .000
1999 13-8-0 .619 3-2-0 .600 1-1 .500
2000 12-8-0 .600 2-3-0 .400 0-1 .000
2001 16-4-0 .800 5-0-0 1.000 2-0 1.00 1-1 (quarterfinals)
2002 10-11-0 .476 2-3-0 .400 0-1 .000
2003 7-11-0 .389 1-4-0 .200
2004 11-9-0 .550 3-2-0 .600 0-1 .000
2005 11-9-0 .550 3-2-0 .600 0-1 .000
2006 10-9-0 .526 2-4-0 .333
Kathleen Parker 316-214-14 .594 56-33-3 .625 9-13 .409 2-3 (.400)
2007 Ange Bradley

(Big East &

Atlantic Coast Conference

2013 onwards )

12-7-0 .632 3-3-0 .500 0-1 .000
2008 22-2-0 .917 5-1-0 .833 2-0 1.00 2-1 (semifinals)
2009 18-4-0 .818 6-0-0 1.000 1-1 .500 1-1 (quarterfinals)
2010 16-5-0 .762 6-0-0 1.000 2-0 1.00 1-1 (quarterfinals)
2011 19-4-0 .826 5-1-0 .833 2-0 1.00 1-1 (quarterfinals)
2012 19-3-0 .864 6-0-0 1.000 1-1 .500 2-1 (semifinals)
2013 16-4-0 .800 4-2-0 .667 1-1 .500 0-1 (first round)
2014 18-6-0 .750 2-4-0 .333 2-1 .667 3-1 (final)
2015 21-1-0 .955 6-0-0 1.000 1-1 .500 4-0 (national champions)
2016 15-4-0 .789 4-2-0 .667 1-0 1.00 1-1 (quarterfinals)
2017 12-7-0 .632 2-4-0 .333 0-1 .000 0-1 (first round)
2018 8-8-0 .500 1-5-0 .167 0-1 .000
2019 12-7-0 .632 3-3-0 .500 0-1 .000 0-1 (first round)
2020 8-8-0 .500 4-6-0 .400 1-1 .500
2021 14-6-0 .700 4-2-0 .667 1-1 .500 1-1 (quarterfinals)
Ange Bradley 230-76-0 .752 61-33-0 .649 15-11 16-11 .593
Program Totals 568-306-21 .646 107-66-3 .616 18-14 .563 (15 appearances)

* began competing in the Big East.
† began competing in the ACC.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Color Palette". Syracuse University Brand Guidelines (PDF). Retrieved December 19, 2022.
  2. ^ a b c d Eyle, Alexandra (Winter 1996). "A Quarter Century of Competition: Syracuse University Women's Athletics". Syracuse University Magazine. 13 (2): 12-17. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  3. ^ a b "Celebrating Women's History at Syracuse". Syracuse University Athletics. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  4. ^ a b c d e f "Orange Season Profiles". Syracuse University Athletics. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  5. ^ a b Quinn, Sean (13 November 2008). "Quinn: Bradley takes SU field hockey to higher level". ESPN. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  6. ^ Mettus, Jon (11 March 2016). "Syracuse's 1st women's basketball and field hockey coach Muriel Smith remembered for pioneering women's sports". The Daily Orange. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  7. ^ Ramsey, Ethan (1 November 2006). "FH: Gross will not retain Parker after 29 seasons as head coach". The Daily Orange. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  8. ^ "Kathleen Parker - Field Hockey Coach". Syracuse University Athletics. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  9. ^ a b Schonbrun, Zach (6 December 2006). "FH : SU hires Bradley as new field hockey coach". The Daily Orange. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  10. ^ Friedell, Nick (27 September 2005). "The Matriarch: After 27 years leading SU field hockey, Kathleen Parker sits one win shy of 300". The Daily Orange. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  11. ^ "Hall of Fame". NFHCA. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  12. ^ Schwedelson, Paul (26 October 2016). "Ange Bradley has turned Syracuse field hockey around after 10 years with the program". The Daily Orange. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  13. ^ Shults, Thomas (28 October 2020). "How Ange Bradley revamped SU's program 5 years after winning NCAA title". The Daily Orange. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  14. ^ Keeley, Sean (5 November 2015). "No. 1 Syracuse Field Hockey Sweeps ACC Awards". Nunes Magician Blog. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  15. ^ Field Hockey (2015) (PDF). Atlantic Coast Conference (Report). Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  16. ^ Fortier, Sam (8 January 2016). "Syracuse field hockey's Ange Bradley named National Coach of the Year". The Daily Orange. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  17. ^ "SU's Bradley named regional coach of the year". WSTM-TV. 10 December 2008. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  18. ^ Andrews, Cooper (March 29, 2023). "'That program is just going to soar': Lynn Farquhar is ready to lead SU, former players say". Daily Orange. Retrieved 13 September 2023.
  19. ^ a b "Syracuse Field Hockey Record Book 2020-21" (PDF). Syracuse Athletics. July 19, 2021. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  20. ^ a b Kramer, Lindsay (26 August 2016). "History-making Syracuse field hockey team: 'We're not champions now'". The Post-Standard. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  21. ^ "Syracuse tops UNC, claims first ever field hockey title". NCAA. January 14, 2016. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  22. ^ Fortier, Sam (23 November 2015). "364 days later, SU field hockey gets its championship". Syracuse Post-Standard. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  23. ^ Sullivan, Liam (22 November 2015). "How Ange Bradley finally got the national title she's been chasing for 25 years". The Daily Orange. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  24. ^ a b Sullivan, Liam (22 November 2015). "Syracuse field hockey becomes 1st women's team in school history to win national championship". The Daily Orange. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  25. ^ "The First. The Only". Syracuse University Athletics. March 31, 2021. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  26. ^ Greene, John Robert (1 November 1998). Syracuse University: Volume V: The Eggers Years. Syracuse University Press. p. 147. ISBN 978-0-8156-0549-2. Retrieved 5 November 2021.
  27. ^ Moriarty, Rick (2015-11-02). "Loss of Coyne Textile ends long history in Syracuse". The Post-Standard. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  28. ^ "J. Stanley Coyne". Syracuse University Athletics. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  29. ^ Iseman, Chris (1 October 2012). "Culture of resistance: Early women's teams at Syracuse struggled in fight for equality". The Daily Orange. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  30. ^ Ramsey, Ethan (22 October 2007). "Building blocks". The Daily Orange. Retrieved 24 October 2021.
  31. ^ "Orange Ready to Open Newly Renovated Coyne Stadium Sept. 9". Syracuse Athletics. August 18, 2016. Retrieved October 24, 2021.
  32. ^ Coyne Stadium Gets a face lift, retrieved 24 October 2021
  33. ^ "Field Hockey Facilities". Syracuse University Athletics. Retrieved 24 October 2021.

External links[edit]