Inter-Services Selection Board

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Inter-Services Selection Board
بین الخدماتی مجلسِ انتخاب
AbbreviationISSB
Formation1952; 72 years ago (1952)[1]
HeadquartersKohat[2]
Locations
Region
Pakistan
Parent organization
Pakistan Armed Forces
Websiteissb.gov.pk

The Inter-Services Selection Board (colloquially known as ISSB) (Urdu: بین الخدماتی مجلسِ انتخاب) is a committee for the selection of commissioned officers in the Pakistan Armed Forces: the Army, the Navy, and the Air Force.

Procedure[edit]

The selection through board is made on the basis of five days of psychological screening to test the ability, aptitude and personality of a candidate.The tests are held in any one of the four centers, namely Kohat, Gujranwala, Quetta and Malir.[3]

Candidates have to go through a thorough procedure of five days. They are tested by the psychologist, Group Testing Officer (GTO) and the Deputy president.[4]

Candidates who pass the selection procedure qualify, provided that they pass a physical test, medical test and general knowledge test[5] to undergo officer training at military academies, primarily the Pakistan Military Academy in Kakul,[6] the Pakistan Naval Academy in Manora[7] the Pakistan Air Force Academy in Risalpur[8] and the SPD's Center of Excellence for Nuclear Security in Chakri.

Coaching[edit]

Coaching for the tests is not officially allowed but nevertheless many academies do exist for this purpose, often run by retired military and board officers.[9]

Trivia[edit]

The first Sikh passed the board's selection procedure in 2005,[10] the first Hindu in 2006[11] and the first women also in 2006.[12]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "About". Inter-Services Selection Board. Retrieved 29 June 2016.
  2. ^ "Contact Details".
  3. ^ "General information". Inter Services Selection Board. Retrieved 3 March 2010.
  4. ^ "Type of Tests".
  5. ^ Mazurek, Kas; Winzer, Margret A. (1994). Comparative studies in special education. Gallaudet University Press. p. 149. ISBN 978-1-56368-027-4.
  6. ^ The Pakistan Review. Ferozsons. 12: 28. 1964. ISSN 0031-0077. {{cite journal}}: Missing or empty |title= (help)
  7. ^ The Detective. East Pakistan Police Co-operative Society. 11: 3. 1966. OCLC 27132648. {{cite journal}}: Missing or empty |title= (help)
  8. ^ Cheema, Pervaiz Iqbal (2002). The armed forces of Pakistan. Allen & Unwin. pp. 106–107. ISBN 978-1-86508-119-9.
  9. ^ "Getting commissioned in forces a dream come true for many". Daily Times. 14 October 2007. Retrieved 3 March 2010.
  10. ^ "Sikh becomes an officer in Pak Army". The Times of India. 20 December 2005. Archived from the original on 11 August 2011. Retrieved 3 March 2010.
  11. ^ "Pak army recruits first Hindu cadet". The Times of India. 25 September 2006. Archived from the original on 11 August 2011. Retrieved 3 March 2010.
  12. ^ "Young women keen to join Pakistan army". The Peninsula. 21 July 2006. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 3 March 2010.

External links[edit]