Herbert v. Shanley Co.

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Herbert v. Shanley Co.
Argued January 10, 1917
Decided January 22, 1917
Full case nameHerbert v. Shanley Co.
Citations242 U.S. 591 (more)
37 S. Ct. 232; 61 L. Ed. 511
Holding
Hotels and restaurants that perform music must compensate composers, even if the venue is not separately charging patrons to hear the music.
Court membership
Chief Justice
Edward D. White
Associate Justices
Joseph McKenna · Oliver W. Holmes Jr.
William R. Day · Willis Van Devanter
Mahlon Pitney · James C. McReynolds
Louis Brandeis · John H. Clarke

Herbert v. Shanley Co., 242 U.S. 591 (1917), was a United States Supreme Court case in which the Court held hotels and restaurants that perform music must compensate composers, even if the venue is not separately charging patrons to hear the music.[1]

The decision legitimized ASCAP, a group founded to collect license fees from businesses that wanted to play performance recordings by its members.[citation needed]

Because this case determined that playing music at the restaurants was an indirect way of profiting from the copyrighted music, it raised the question of what sort of indirect use would be too indirect to constitute infringement. Broadly speaking, this question was not anticipated by the Copyright Act and judges considered this a thorny problem. Nevertheless, courts made decisions indicating that commercial radio broadcasts and uses in advertising were sufficiently direct.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Herbert v. Shanley Co., 242 U.S. 591 (1917).
  2. ^ "Copyright-Infringement by Radio Broadcasting". Harvard Law Review. 39 (2): 269–269. 1925. doi:10.2307/1328504. ISSN 0017-811X.

External links[edit]