Fox Film Corp. v. Knowles

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Fox Film Corp. v. Knowles
Argued February 27, 1923
Decided March 12, 1923
Full case nameFox Film Corp. v. Knowles
Citations261 U.S. 326 (more)
43 S. Ct. 365; 67 L. Ed. 680
Case history
Prior279 F. 1018 (2d Cir. 1922)
Holding
The statute intends that an executor, there being no widow, widower, or child, shall have the same right to renew a copyright for a second term as his testator might have exercised were he still alive.
Court membership
Chief Justice
William H. Taft
Associate Justices
Joseph McKenna · Oliver W. Holmes Jr.
Willis Van Devanter · James C. McReynolds
Louis Brandeis · George Sutherland
Pierce Butler · Edward T. Sanford
Case opinion
MajorityHolmes, joined by a unanimous court
Laws applied
Copyright Act of 1909

Fox Film Corp. v. Knowles, 261 U.S. 326 (1923), was a United States Supreme Court case in which the Court held the statute intends that an executor, there being no widow, widower, or child, shall have the same right to renew a copyright for a second term as his testator might have exercised had he continued to survive.[1]

This case was reaffirmed in Miller Music Corp. v. Charles N. Daniels, Inc..[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Fox Film Corp. v. Knowles, 261 U.S. 326 (1923).
  2. ^ Miller Music Corp. v. Charles N. Daniels, Inc., 362 U.S. 373 (1960).

External links[edit]