Fortnightly Corp. v. United Artists Television, Inc.

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Fortnightly Corp. v. United Artists Television, Inc.
Argued March 13, 1968
Decided June 17, 1968
Full case nameFortnightly Corp. v. United Artists Television, Inc.
Citations392 U.S. 390 (more)
88 S. Ct. 2084; 20 L. Ed. 2d 1176
Case history
Prior377 F.2d 872 (2d Cir. 1967)
Holding
Receiving a television broadcast does not constitute a "performance" of a work.
Court membership
Chief Justice
Earl Warren
Associate Justices
Hugo Black · William O. Douglas
John M. Harlan II · William J. Brennan Jr.
Potter Stewart · Byron White
Abe Fortas · Thurgood Marshall
Case opinions
MajorityStewart, joined by Warren, Black, Brennan, White
DissentFortas
Douglas, Marshall, and Harlan took no part in the consideration or decision of the case.

Fortnightly Corp. v. United Artists Television, Inc., 392 U.S. 390 (1968), was a United States Supreme Court case in which the Court held that receiving a television broadcast does not constitute a "performance" of a work.[1]

In 1968, the United States Copyright Office called this case "the most important American copyright case of the 1960s."[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Fortnightly Corp. v. United Artists Television, Inc., 392 U.S. 390 (1968).
  2. ^ Abraham L. Kaminstein. 71st Annual Report of the Register of Copyrights (PDF) (Report). United States Copyright Office. Retrieved 2018-08-19.

External links[edit]