Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago

Coordinates: 41°52′43″N 87°37′54″W / 41.878484°N 87.631567°W / 41.878484; -87.631567
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago
Federal Reserve Seal
Federal Reserve Seal
Headquarters
Headquarters
Headquarters230 S LaSalle Street
Chicago, IL, USA
EstablishedMay 18, 1914 (109 years ago) (1914-05-18)
PresidentAustan Goolsbee
Central bank of
Seventh District
Websitechicagofed.org
The Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago is one of 12 regional banks that make up the Federal Reserve System

The Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago (informally the Chicago Fed) is one of twelve Federal Reserve Banks that, along with the Federal Reserve Board of Governors, make up the Federal Reserve System, the United States' central bank. The Chicago Fed serves the Seventh District, which encompasses the northern portions of Illinois and Indiana, southern Wisconsin, the Lower Peninsula of Michigan, and the state of Iowa. In addition to participation in the formulation of monetary policy, each Reserve Bank supervises member banks and bank holding companies, provides financial services to depository institutions and the U.S. government, and monitors economic conditions in its District.

The Chicago Fed was established on May 18, 1914, when representatives from five Seventh District banks formally signed the Chicago Fed's organization certificate.[1] The Bank officially opened for business on Monday, November 16, 1914.[2]

Responsibilities[edit]

Map of the Seventh District

As one of the Reserve Banks that make up the Federal Reserve System, the Chicago Fed is responsible for:

  • Helping to formulate national monetary policy. The Chicago Fed's CEO, Austan Goolsbee, helps formulate monetary policy by taking part and voting in meetings of the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC).
  • Providing financial services such as cash, check clearing and electronic payment processing. Each day the Federal Reserve System processes millions of payments in the form of both paper checks and electronic transfers. These payments services are offered to institutions in the Seventh District on a fee basis. Because of a nationwide reduction in the use of checking instruments, the Chicago Fed and most other Reserve Banks ceased processing paper checks on November 17, 2009 and electronic checks in 2010.[3] Items previously routed to this facility are now routed to the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland or to the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  • Supervising and regulating state-chartered banks that are members of the Federal Reserve System, bank holding companies, and financial holding companies. These organizations are located within the Seventh District.

Leadership[edit]

Austan Goolsbee is the current president of the Chicago Fed. He took office on January 9, 2023 as the tenth president and chief executive officer of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.[4][5]

Ellen Bromagen is first vice president and chief operating officer of the Chicago Fed.[6]

Anna Paulson is Executive Vice President and Director of Research.[7]

The Chicago Fed annually co-hosts in Chicago an international banking conference to examine cross-national banking and finance issues.[8]

History[edit]

The Chicago Fed's headquarters is 17 stories high

The Chicago Fed was established on May 18, 1914, when representatives from five Seventh District banks formally signed the Chicago Fed's organization certificate.[1] The Bank officially opened for business with 41 employees on Monday, November 16, 1914.[1][2][9]

Bankers in Michigan, frustrated by business delays caused by travel time to Chicago, lobbied the Chicago Fed to create a branch office in Detroit (then the second largest industrial area in the Seventh District).[2][9] The Bank's board of directors agreed to establish a Detroit Branch in a vote in November 1917.[2]

By 1919, the Chicago Fed had expanded to 1,200 employees and outgrown its office spaces, which were scattered across various buildings in the Loop.[2] The Bank purchased a lot on LaSalle Street and commissioned the architectural firm of Graham, Anderson, Probst and White—which also designed the Continental Illinois Building across the street—to design its new headquarters.[9] The landmark Beaux-Arts building opened in 1922.[9]

The Bank opened its Money Museum in 2001.[10]

Money Museum[edit]

The Money Museum traces the history of the Federal Reserve Bank and also displays currency used in the past.

The bank's Charles L. Evans Money Museum[11] is free and open to the public year-round from 8:30am to 5pm, Monday through Friday, except on Bank holidays.[12] All visitors must show a photo identification, walk through a metal detector and have their bags x-rayed before entering the Money Museum. No food or drink are allowed in the museum. A presentation lasting roughly 45 minutes is available at 1pm on Monday through Friday, or by appointment. The rest of the Money Museum is accessible at any time during open hours. The museum includes a free kiosk, which takes a guest's picture in front of a million dollars in $100 bills. A million dollars in $1 bills and a million dollars in $20 bills are on display. The museum has been known for giving out bags of shredded money as souvenirs.[13]

Branch[edit]

The Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago has a branch office in Detroit.[14]

Board of directors[edit]

The following people are on the board of directors as of 2023.[15] Class A directors are elected by member banks to represent member banks. Class B directors are elected by member banks to represent the public. Class C directors are appointed by the board of governors to represent the public. The current chair is Jennifer Scanlon and the current deputy chair Juan Salgado.

Members of board of directors
Director Title Director
Class
Term
Expires
Christopher J. Murphy III Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, 1st Source Bank, South Bend, Indiana A 2024
Michael O'Grady Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Northern Trust, Chicago, Illinois A 2023
Susan Whitson Chief Executive Officer, First Bank, Waverly, Iowa A 2025
David C. Habinger President & Chief Executive Officer, J.D. Power, Troy, Michigan B 2023
Linda Hubbard President and Chief Operating Officer, Carhartt, Inc., Dearborn, Michigan B 2024
Linda Jojo Executive Vice President, Chief Customer Officer, United Airlines, Inc., Chicago, Illinois B 2025
Juan Salgado, Deputy Chair Chancellor, City Colleges of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois C 2024
Jennifer Scanlon, Chair President & Chief Executive Officer, UL Solutions, Northbrook, Illinois C 2024
Maurice Smith President, CEO and Vice Chair, Health Care Service Corporation, Chicago, Illinois C 2025
Detroit Branch Board of Directors
Director Title Term Expires
Sandy K. Baruah President and chief executive officer, Detroit Regional Chamber, Detroit, Michigan 2023
Chávez, JoAnn Senior Vice President and Chief Legal Officer, DTE Energy, Detroit, Michigan 2023
Anika Goss Chief Executive Officer, Detroit Future City, Detroit, Michigan 2024
Ronald E. Hall President and Chief Executive Officer, Bridgewater Interiors, LLC, Detroit, Michigan 2025
James M. Nicholson Chairman, PVS Chemicals, Inc., Detroit, Michigan 2024
Kevin Nowlan Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, BorgWarner Inc., Auburn Hills, Michigan 2023
Dr. M. Roy Wilson President, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 2023

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Chicago Fed History: 1907-1914 - Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago". www.chicagofed.org. Retrieved 2023-12-11.
  2. ^ a b c d e "Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago | Federal Reserve History". www.federalreservehistory.org. Retrieved 2023-12-11.
  3. ^ "Check restructuring". The Federal Reserve. December 29, 2012. Archived from the original on July 13, 2010. Retrieved July 6, 2010.
  4. ^ "Charles Evans". The Federal Reserve. July 27, 2016. Archived from the original on January 22, 2019. Retrieved July 27, 2016.
  5. ^ https://www.chicagofed.org/people/chicago-fed-presidents
  6. ^ "Ellen Bromagen". The Federal Reserve. July 27, 2016. Archived from the original on October 5, 2016. Retrieved July 27, 2016.
  7. ^ "Anna Paulson - Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago". www.chicagofed.org. Archived from the original on 2022-01-12. Retrieved 2022-01-12.
  8. ^ "International Series". The Federal Reserve. July 27, 2016. Archived from the original on June 12, 2016. Retrieved July 27, 2016.
  9. ^ a b c d "History of the Chicago Fed - Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago". www.chicagofed.org. Retrieved 2023-12-11.
  10. ^ "100 Years At LaSalle". Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago. Retrieved December 11, 2023.
  11. ^ "Money Museum". The Federal Reserve. December 29, 2012. Archived from the original on January 8, 2010. Retrieved February 24, 2010.
  12. ^ "Bank Holidays". The Federal Reserve. December 29, 2012. Archived from the original on November 22, 2010. Retrieved March 1, 2011.
  13. ^ "Bags of shredded money given as souvenirs to students". The Federal Reserve. July 27, 2016. Archived from the original on September 9, 2016. Retrieved July 27, 2016.
  14. ^ "About Us - Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago". www.chicagofed.org. Archived from the original on 2022-01-29. Retrieved 2022-01-25.
  15. ^ "Directors of Federal Reserve Banks and Branches". The Federal Reserve. July 27, 2016. Archived from the original on November 29, 2016. Retrieved July 27, 2016.

External links[edit]

41°52′43″N 87°37′54″W / 41.878484°N 87.631567°W / 41.878484; -87.631567