Farzana Doctor

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Farzana Doctor
Farzana Doctor
Farzana Doctor
BornZambia
OccupationWriter
NationalityCanadian
Period2000s-present
Notable worksSix Metres of Pavement
Notable awards2011 Dayne Ogilvie Prize
2012 Lambda Literary Award for Lesbian Fiction
Website
www.farzanadoctor.com

Farzana Doctor is a Canadian novelist and social worker.

Biography[edit]

Born in Zambia to Dawoodi Bohra Muslim expatriate parents from India, she immigrated to Canada with her family in the early 1970s.[1][2][3]

She has published three novels to date, and won the 2011 Dayne Ogilvie Grant from the Writers' Trust of Canada for an emerging lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender writer.[4] Her second novel, Six Metres of Pavement, was also a nominee for the 2012 Lambda Literary Awards in the category of Lesbian Fiction,[5] and was announced as the winner of the award on June 4, 2012.[6] In 2017, it won the One Book, One Brampton award. In 2015, her third novel, All Inclusive, was released in Canada, and it was later released in the US in 2017. It was a Kobo 2015 and National Post Best Book of the Year.

In addition to her writing career, Doctor works as a registered social worker, in a private psychotherapy practice, coordinates a regular reading series in Toronto's Brockton Village neighbourhood,[7] and coproduced Rewriting The Script: A Loveletter to Our Families, a documentary film about the family relationships of LGBT people in Toronto's South Asian immigrant communities.[8]

CBC Books listed Doctor's 2020 novel Seven on its list of Canadian fiction to watch for in spring 2020.[9]

Books[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jayanthi Madhukar (January 21, 2013). "Evangelist She Is Not". Bangalore Mirror. Archived from the original on February 15, 2016. Retrieved February 10, 2016.
  2. ^ Shaukat Ajmeri (September 26, 2015). "Farzana Doctor: Making the write choice". Archived from the original on February 15, 2016. Retrieved February 10, 2016.
  3. ^ ROB MCLENNAN (November 15, 2015). "12 or 20 (second series) questions with Farzana Doctor". Retrieved February 10, 2016.
  4. ^ "Farzana Doctor to receive Dayne Ogilvie Grant" Archived August 5, 2012, at the Wayback Machine. Quill & Quire, June 1, 2011.
  5. ^ "Toronto writers up for Lambda Literary awards" Archived May 17, 2012, at the Wayback Machine. Xtra!, May 11, 2012.
  6. ^ "Farzana Doctor wins Lambda Literary Award" Archived September 29, 2012, at the Wayback Machine. Quill & Quire, June 6, 2012.
  7. ^ "Farzana Doctor sees hyper-local reading series grow" Archived February 7, 2011, at the Wayback Machine. Xtra!, February 1, 2011.
  8. ^ "Farzana Doctor touring new novel". Xtra!, November 8, 2007.
  9. ^ "47 works of Canadian fiction to watch for in spring 2020". CBC Books. February 5, 2020. Retrieved February 7, 2020. Here are 47 works of Canadian fiction to watch for in spring 2020.{{cite news}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)

External links[edit]