Esther Morris Leidolf

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Esther Morris Leidolf
NationalityAmerican
Occupation(s)activist
writer
speaker
Websitehttp://mrkh.org

Esther Morris Leidolf is a US-based medical sociologist,[1] an intersex activist, writer, the founder of the MRKH Organization, and was the board secretary for the Intersex Society of North America.[2][3]

Career[edit]

Esther Morris Leidolf is a US-based medical sociologist and health worker,[1] writer, the founder of the MRKH Organization, and was the board secretary for the now-defunct Intersex Society of North America.[2][3] In roles with ISNA and MRKH Organization, Morris Leidolf spoke at conferences and events, including the LGBTI Health Summit.[4] Works include The Missing Vagina Monologue.[5][6][7] Morris Leidolf has stated,

"Being born without a vagina was not my problem. Having to get one was the real problem."[2]

Alongside other activists, Morris Leidolf was critical of a 2006 shift in clinical language from intersex to disorders of sex development.[8][9] Morris Leidolf also appears in the award-winning 2012 documentary Intersexion and the 2019 Global MRKH Footprint video [1].

Selected bibliography[edit]

  • Morris Leidolf, Esther; Curran, Megan; Scout; Bradford, Judith (May 2008). "Intersex Mental Health and Social Support Options in Pediatric Endocrinology Training Programs". Journal of Homosexuality. 54 (3): 233–242. doi:10.1080/00918360801982074. ISSN 0091-8369. PMID 18825861. S2CID 205468762.
  • Leidolf, Esther Morris (July 2006). "The Missing Vagina Monologue … and Beyond". Journal of Gay & Lesbian Psychotherapy. 10 (2): 77–92. doi:10.1300/J236v10n02_05. ISSN 0891-7140.
  • Morris, Esther (February 2, 2004). "The self I will never know". New Internationalist. Retrieved 2018-08-31.
  • Morris, Esther (March 2001). "The Missing Vagina Monologue". Sojourner: The Women's Forum. 26 (7). ISSN 0191-8699.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Morris Leidolf, Esther; Curran, Megan; Scout; Bradford, Judith (May 2008). "Intersex Mental Health and Social Support Options in Pediatric Endocrinology Training Programs". Journal of Homosexuality. 54 (3): 233–242. doi:10.1080/00918360801982074. ISSN 0091-8369. PMID 18825861. S2CID 205468762.
  2. ^ a b c "Intersex Activists Respond to "The Vagina Monologues"". Intersex Society of North America. January 7, 2002. {{cite web}}: Missing or empty |url= (help)
  3. ^ a b "Esther Morris Leidolf". Our Bodies Our Selves. Retrieved 2018-08-31.
  4. ^ "Intersex Prominently Featured in the LGBTI Health Summit". Intersex Initiative. Aug 22, 2004. Retrieved 2018-08-31.
  5. ^ Still, Brian (2008). Online Intersex Communities: Virtual Neighborhoods of Support and Activism. Cambia Press. p. 115. ISBN 9781604975925.
  6. ^ Santos, Ana Lúcia (October 2014). "Beyond Binarism? Intersex as an Epistemological and Political Challenge*". RCCS Annual Review (6). doi:10.4000/rccsar.558. ISSN 1647-3175.
  7. ^ Zaccone, Laura A. (2010). "Policing the Policing of Intersex Bodies: Softening the Lines in Title IX Athletic Programs". Brooklyn Law Review. 76 (76).
  8. ^ Davis, Georgiann (September 2015). Contesting Intersex: The Dubious Diagnosis. NYU Press. p. 45. ISBN 9781479887040.
  9. ^ Koch, Michaela (2017). Discursive Intersexions: Daring Bodies between Myth, Medicine, and Memoir. transcript Verlag. p. 138. ISBN 9783839437056.

External links[edit]