Denise Andrea Campbell

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Denise Andrea Campbell
Born1975
Jamaica
NationalityCanadian
Known forYoungest president of the National Action Committee on the Status of Women

Denise Andrea Campbell[1] (born 1975) is the Jamaican-Canadian executive director of social development at the City of Toronto who was also the youngest president of the National Action Committee on the Status of Women.

Early life[edit]

Campbell was born in Jamaica in 1975 and moved to Canada in 1980.[2]

Career[edit]

She became the youngest president of the National Action Committee on the Status of Women in 2001, but resigned soon after when they did not pay her[3] as the organization faced financial crisis.[4]

Campbell is executive director of social development at the Municipal government of Toronto[5] where she runs an $11 million program[6] to improve responses to mental health emergencies.[7] In 2021, she spoke of how much work was needed to tackle racism and encouraged Toronto City staff to collaborate with organizations that were already addressing problem before starting new initiatives.[8]

Family life[edit]

Campbell has twin boys.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "'Time for change': Toronto launching service to respond to mental health crisis calls". Toronto. 2022-03-24. Retrieved 2022-03-28.
  2. ^ Williams, D. P. (2002). Who's who in Black Canada: Black Success and Black Excellence in Canada : a Contemporary Directory, 2002. Canada: D.P. Williams & Associates. p1995
  3. ^ Cheryl Collier (2014). "Not Quite the Death of Organized Feminism in Canada: Understanding the Demise of the National Action Committee on the Status of Women".
  4. ^ Azzi, S., Gough, B. M. (2021). Historical Dictionary of Canada. United States: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
  5. ^ "Creating a more equitable city". The Toronto Star. 2015-10-25. ISSN 0319-0781. Retrieved 2022-03-28.
  6. ^ Ehrenworth |, Daniel (2021-11-18). "The 50 Most Influential Torontonians of 2021". Toronto Life. Retrieved 2022-03-28.
  7. ^ a b Yousif, Nadine (2021-04-25). "Toronto approved non-police crisis response teams. This woman is trying to build them". The Toronto Star. ISSN 0319-0781. Retrieved 2022-03-28.
  8. ^ "Building trust is key to combating systemic racism, council told". GuelphToday.com. Retrieved 2022-03-28.