Buck v. Jewell-LaSalle Realty Co.

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Buck v. Jewell-LaSalle Realty Co.
Argued March 3–4, 1931
Decided April 13, 1931
Full case nameBuck v. Jewell-LaSalle Realty Co.
Citations283 U.S. 191 (more)
51 S. Ct. 410; 75 L. Ed. 971
Holding
A hotel operator which provided headphones connected to a centrally controlled radio receiver was guilty of copyright infringement, because "reception of a radio broadcast and its translation into audible sound is not a mere audition of the original program. It is essentially a reproduction."
Court membership
Chief Justice
Charles E. Hughes
Associate Justices
Oliver W. Holmes Jr. · Willis Van Devanter
James C. McReynolds · Louis Brandeis
George Sutherland · Pierce Butler
Harlan F. Stone · Owen Roberts
Case opinion
MajorityBrandeis, joined by a unanimous court
Overruled by
Twentieth Century Music Corp. v. Aiken

Buck v. Jewell-LaSalle Realty Co., 283 U.S. 191 (1931), was a United States Supreme Court case in which the Court held a hotel operator which provided headphones connected to a centrally controlled radio receiver was guilty of copyright infringement, because "reception of a radio broadcast and its translation into audible sound is not a mere audition of the original program. It is essentially a reproduction."[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Buck v. Jewell-LaSalle Realty Co., 283 U.S. 191 (1931)

External links[edit]