Ayaz Sadiq

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Ayaz Sadiq
ایاز صادق
Federal Minister For Economic Affairs
In office
19 April 2022 – 10 July 2023
PresidentArif Alvi
Prime MinisterShehbaz Sharif
Preceded byOmar Ayub Khan
19th Speaker of the National Assembly of Pakistan
In office
9 November 2015 – 15 August 2018
DeputyMurtaza Javed Abbasi
Preceded byMurtaza Javed Abbasi (Acting)
Succeeded byAsad Qaiser
In office
3 June 2013 – 22 August 2015
DeputyMurtaza Javed Abbasi
Preceded byFahmida Mirza
Succeeded byMurtaza Javed Abbasi (Acting)
Member of the National Assembly of Pakistan
In office
13 August 2018 – 10 August 2023
ConstituencyNA-129 (Lahore-VII)
In office
18 November 2002 – 31 May 2018
ConstituencyNA-122 (Lahore-V)
Personal details
Born (1954-10-17) 17 October 1954 (age 69)[1][2]
Lahore, Punjab, Pakistan
NationalityPakistani
Political party Pakistan Muslim League (N)
(2001–present)
Other political
affiliations
Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf (1996-1998)
Spouse
Reema Ayaz
(m. 1977)
[3]
Children3
Alma materAitchison College

Sardar Ayaz Sadiq (Punjabi, Urdu: سردار اياز صادق; born 17 October 1954) is a Pakistani politician who was a member of the National Assembly of Pakistan from August 2018 till August 2023. Previously, he was a member of the National Assembly from 2002 to May 2018. He served as the 19th Speaker of the National Assembly of Pakistan from June 2013 to August 2015 and again from November 2015 to August 2018. Sadiq chaired the Parliament Session in April 2022 on the day of the No confidence motion against Imran Khan, and conducted in-house voting for the New Prime Minister, later Shehbaz Sharif was elected as the new Prime Minister on April 11th, 2022.

Early and personal life[edit]

Sadiq was born on 17 October 1954[4][5] in Lahore to Sardar Muhammad Sadiq and Attiya Sadiq.[2] He completed his education at Aitchison College, Lahore. Imran Khan, Nisar Ali Khan, Pervaiz Khattak, Sardar Akhtar Mengal and Zulfiqar Ali Magsi were among his class fellows when Sadiq was enrolled in Aitchison College.[1] In an interview, Sadiq said he was an average student.[6] Sadiq received a degree in commerce from Hailey College of Punjab University in 1975.[1]

Sadiq married to Reema Ayaz in 1977, and has a daughter and two sons.[2] Sadiq is a son-in-law of former Chief Justice of Lahore High Court Sardar Iqbal.[1]

Since 1996, Sadiq has been a member of the Lahore Gymkhana Club.[1] Sadiq is a businessman by profession.[1] He along with members of his family runs a non-profit hospital "Sardar Trust Eye Hospital" in Lahore.[1][2]

Political career[edit]

Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf[edit]

Sadiq began his political career as a member of the Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf (PTI) in the late 1990s[1] when he was a close friend of PTI chairman Imran Khan.[6] Sadiq ran for the seat of Provincial Assembly of the Punjab as a candidate of PTI in 1997 Pakistani general election from Constituency PP-121 Lahore but was unsuccessful. He received 4,541 votes and lost the seat to Pakistan Muslim League (N) (PML-N).[7]

Pakistan Muslim League (N)[edit]

Sadiq left PTI in 1998 owing to differences with Imran Khan[6] and joined PML (N) in 2001.[2]

Sadiq was elected to the National Assembly of Pakistan as a candidate of PML-N from Constituency NA-122 (Lahore-V) on 2002 general election,[8][9][6] by defeating Imran Khan.[1] Sadiq claimed "it was a big victory as his leader Nawaz Sharif in exile and Pervez Musharraf, a close aide of Imran Khan at that time, in power".[6] During his tenure as the member of the National Assembly, he remained a member of the National Assembly's Standing Committees on Railways,[1] Finance and Defence Production.[2]

Sadiq was re-elected to the National Assembly as a candidate of PML-N from Constituency NA-122 (Lahore-V) in 2008 general election.[10][9] During his tenure as the member of the National Assembly, he became the chairman of the National Assembly's Standing Committees on Railways.[1]

Sadiq was re-elected to the National Assembly as a candidate of PML-N from Constituency NA-122 (Lahore-V) in the 2013 Pakistani general election,[9] by defeating Imran Khan.[11][1] In June 2013, Sadiq was elected as the Speaker of the National Assembly of Pakistan.[11][12][13][14]

In 2015, Imran Khan alleged rigging in the constituency of Sadiq from where Sadiq won in 2013 election.[15] Following which the Election Commission of Pakistan de-seated Sadiq and ordered re-polling in the constituency.[16] In October 2015, Sadiq retained his National Assembly seat by defeating a PTI candidate in by-election and was re-elected to the National Assembly for the fourth time.[17][18] In November 2015, Sadiq retained its position as the speaker of the National Assembly by getting re-elected for the second time[19] and become the first person to have been elected as the Speaker of the National Assembly for the second time during the same government's tenure in Pakistan.[19]

He was re-elected to the National Assembly as a candidate of PML-N from Constituency NA-129 (Lahore-VII) in 2018 Pakistani general election.[20] On 15 August 2018, he was replaced by Asad Qaiser as speaker of the National Assembly.[21]

He is generally considered a soft-spoken[21] and cool-headed politician in Pakistan.[1]

In 2020, he made claims relating to the 2019 India–Pakistan border skirmishes, in particular that foreign minister Qureshi was "trembling with fear" and insisted on releasing a pilot captured during the conflict, to avert an Indian invasion. This issue initiated a row, drawing sharp criticism from ISPR and the Pakistani government, terming his statements as "irresponsible" and demanding an apology. He addressed the controversy and added that his statement was misrepresented. Sadiq added that "Abhinandan had not come to Pakistan to distribute sweets; he had attacked Pakistan and it was a victory for Pakistan when his plane was shot down".[22]

Amid the April 2022 political crisis in Pakistan, when the speaker and the deputy speaker resigned, he was asked to hold voting on a no-confidence motion against the prime minister of Pakistan.[23]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m "Ayaz Sadiq – a profile". Dawn. Pakistan. 4 June 2013. Archived from the original on 29 July 2017. Retrieved 11 January 2017.
  2. ^ a b c d e f "Profile of Speaker". National Assembly of Pakistan. Archived from the original on 11 January 2017. Retrieved 11 January 2017.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  3. ^ "Aleem Khan and Ayaz Sadiq are married to daughters of ex-LHC judges". The News International. Retrieved 3 August 2018.
  4. ^ "If elections are held on time…". The News International. Retrieved 4 December 2017.
  5. ^ "Detail Information". 19 April 2014. Archived from the original on 19 April 2014. Retrieved 10 July 2017.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  6. ^ a b c d e "I hit Imran with a hockey stick, says NA Speaker". Dawn. Pakistan. 30 April 2013. Archived from the original on 19 August 2017. Retrieved 11 January 2017.
  7. ^ "Election Result" (PDF). Election Commission of Pakistan. Archived from the original (PDF) on 30 August 2017. Retrieved 30 August 2017.
  8. ^ "As Pakistan goes to polls: Take a peek at some major NA constituencies". Dawn. Pakistan. 10 May 2013. Archived from the original on 5 March 2017. Retrieved 6 April 2017.
  9. ^ a b c "Imran Khan loses Lahore seat to PML-N – The Express Tribune". The Express Tribune. 12 May 2013. Archived from the original on 22 August 2017. Retrieved 11 January 2017.
  10. ^ "NA-122-Lahore-V election results". Geo News. Archived from the original on 28 March 2008. Retrieved 11 January 2017.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  11. ^ a b "PML-N's Ayaz Sadiq submits nomination papers for speaker NA". Dawn. Pakistan. 2 June 2013. Archived from the original on 13 January 2017. Retrieved 11 January 2017.
  12. ^ "Coveted posts: New speaker, his deputy in saddle – The Express Tribune". The Express Tribune. 4 June 2013. Archived from the original on 23 August 2017. Retrieved 11 January 2017.
  13. ^ "PML-N's Ayaz Sadiq elected speaker of the National Assembly – The Express Tribune". The Express Tribune. 3 June 2013. Archived from the original on 22 August 2017. Retrieved 11 January 2017.
  14. ^ "PML-Ns Sardar Ayaz elected NA speaker, Murtaza Javed deputy". Geo News. 7 June 2013. Archived from the original on 7 June 2013. Retrieved 11 January 2017.{{cite news}}: CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  15. ^ "NA-122 rigging allegations: Tribunal terms Ayaz Sadiq's election null and void – The Express Tribune". The Express Tribune. 22 August 2015. Archived from the original on 22 June 2016. Retrieved 11 January 2017.
  16. ^ "NA-122 election tribunal deseats Ayaz Sadiq, orders re-polling". Dawn. Pakistan. 22 August 2015. Archived from the original on 13 January 2017. Retrieved 11 January 2017.
  17. ^ "Ayaz Sadiq takes oath as MNA". Dawn. Pakistan. 6 November 2015. Archived from the original on 13 January 2017. Retrieved 11 January 2017.
  18. ^ "Ayaz Sadiq retakes NA-122, but PML-N loses provincial assembly seat to PTI". Dawn. Pakistan. 12 October 2015. Archived from the original on 13 January 2017. Retrieved 11 January 2017.
  19. ^ a b "Ayaz Sadiq elected NA Speaker again". Dawn. Pakistan. 9 November 2015. Archived from the original on 13 January 2017. Retrieved 11 January 2017.
  20. ^ "PML (N) Sardar Ayaz Sadiq wins NA-129 election". Associated Press of Pakistan. 27 July 2018. Retrieved 3 August 2018.
  21. ^ a b Wasim, Amir (17 August 2018). "PTI finally takes up reins of National Assembly". Dawn. Pakistan. Retrieved 17 August 2018.
  22. ^ Hussian, Javed (29 October 2020). "'Misleading' to link Abhinandan's release with anything other than Pakistan's mature response: DG ISPR". The Dawn. Retrieved 30 October 2020.
  23. ^ "Pakistan political crisis latest updates: Khan removed as PM". Al Jazeera. 10 April 2022. Retrieved 11 April 2022.
Political offices
Preceded by Speaker of the National Assembly
2013 – 2018
Succeeded by