American Women quarters

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American Women quarter
United States
Value25 cents (0.25 US dollars)
Mass5.67 g (standard)
6.34 g (silver proof) g
Diameter24.26 mm (0.955 in)
Thickness1.75 mm (0.069 in)
Edge119 reeds
Composition91.67% Cu 8.33% Ni (standard)
99.9% Ag (silver proof)
Years of minting2022–2025
Obverse
DesignGeorge Washington
DesignerLaura Gardin Fraser
Design date1931
Reverse
DesignVarious; up to five designs per year (first design shown)
DesignerVarious

The American Women quarters program is a series of quarters featuring notable women in U.S. history, commemorating the centennial of the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution.[1] The United States Mint is issuing five designs each year from 2022 to 2025 for 20 total designs. One woman will be honored on the reverse of each coin, selected for "contributions to the United States in a wide spectrum of accomplishments and fields, including but not limited to suffrage, civil rights, abolition, government, humanities, science, space, and arts."[2] The obverse depicts George Washington with a new design.[3]

The program was authorized by the Circulating Collectible Coin Redesign Act of 2020, sponsored by Representatives Barbara Lee and Anthony Gonzalez.[4] The original proposal was for 56 quarters, honoring one woman from each state and territory,[5] but with a set of circulating coins intended to be released in 2026 for the United States Semiquincentennial, it was amended to be shorter. One of the five quarters in that set will also feature a woman.[1] It replaced an alternative proposal of quarters featuring animals or endangered species.[6] It will be followed in 2027–2030 with a series depicting youth sports.[7]

It succeeds the America the Beautiful quarters and Washington Crossing the Delaware quarter. Some coin collectors were critical of the "seemingly unending" proposal to continue to issue five new quarter designs every year for a third decade.[8] Many numismatists are more interested in redesigns of other denominations and less frequent releases.[9]

Designs[edit]

Obverse[edit]

Laura Gardin Fraser's portrait of George Washington, which was originally submitted in 1931, was selected by the Commission of Fine Arts and Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee to appear on the obverse of the American Women quarters. The right-facing bust had been used for the 1999 George Washington half eagle for the 200th anniversary of Washington's death.[10]

Reverse[edit]

The United States Secretary of the Treasury selects the women featured for the series in consultation with the Smithsonian Institution's American Women's History Initiative, the National Women's History Museum, and the Congressional Caucus for Women's Issues. Recommendations for women honorees were solicited from the public in 2021.[11][12]

Honorees featured in 2022 are[13][14]

  • Maya Angelou, the first Black woman featured on U.S. currency.[15] Designed by Emily Damstra, who said her depiction of Angelou "convey[s] the passionate way she lived". She indicated that the bird in flight that silhouetted Angelou's arms was modeled on a Purple martin, which is native to Angelou's home state of Arkansas, and symbolized her autobiography I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings.[16] Oprah Winfrey called the design "a true treasure" and "an incredible moment" to commemorate her friend and poet's life.[17] Because a bust portrait was not permitted, Damstra chose to limit the details in the quarter, balancing negative space.[18]
  • Sally Ride, the first LGBT person on U.S. currency.[19] Her partner Tam O'Shaughnessy said Ride's design by the Space Shuttle's window reflected her quote, "But when I wasn't working, I was usually at a window looking down at Earth." It shows her wearing a patch with an element Ride designed for the STS-7 mission that represented her being the first American woman in space.[20] The design was unveiled at the 2021 Space Symposium.[21]
  • Wilma Mankiller; her quarter was released at an event at the Cherokee National Capitol. The Mint's deputy director said "This coin's design reflects the strength and determination it took for Wilma Mankiller to become the first woman elected principal chief of the Cherokee Nation and to fight for Native American and women's rights".[22]
  • Adelina Otero-Warren, the first Hispanic American on U.S. currency.[23]
  • Anna May Wong, the first Asian American on U.S. currency. Also designed by Emily Damstra, who watched one of Wong's films to prepare her depiction.[16]

Honorees to be featured in 2023 are[24]

List of designs[edit]

Year No. Woman Design Elements depicted Artist(s) Release date Mintage
Sculptor

(Medallic Artist)

Designer

(Artistic Infusion Program)

Denver Philadelphia San Francisco Total
2022 1 Maya Angelou Angelou with her arms outstretched, in front of a flying bird and sunrise.[26] Craig Campbell[27] Emily Damstra[27] January 3, 2022[28] 258,200,000 237,600,000 303,480 496,103,480
2 Sally Ride Ride next to a Space Shuttle window, with Earth in the background.[26] Phebe Hemphill[29][30] Elana Hagler [29] March 22, 2022 278,000,000 275,200,000 304,000 553,504,000
3 Wilma Mankiller Mankiller wearing a shawl, by a seven-pointed Cherokee Nation star and ᏣᎳᎩᎯ ᎠᏰᎵ ("Cherokee Nation" in Cherokee syllabary).[26] Benjamin Sowards[30] June 6, 2022 296,800,000 310,000,000 304,680 607,104,680
4 Nina Otero-Warren Otero-Warren with three Yucca flowers and the Spanish inscription Voto para la mujer (Vote for Women).[26] Craig Campbell[31] Chris Costello[31] August 15, 2022 219,200,000 225,000,000 305,560 444,505,560
5 Anna May Wong Wong is surrounded by marquee lights.[26] John P. McGraw[32] Emily Damstra[32] October 25, 2022 240,800,000 226,800,000 303,080 467,903,080
2023[24] 6 Bessie Coleman Coleman looking into the clouds and a flying biplane. The inscription "6.15.1921" is the date she received a pilot's license.[33] Eric David Custer[33] Chris Costello[33] January 3, 2023 TBD TBD TBD TBD
7 Edith Kanakaʻole Kanakaʻole, with her hair and lei poʻo (head lei) blending into a Hawaiian landscape. The inscription "E hō mai ka ʻike" translates to "granting the wisdom" and refers to the role of hula and chants in cultural preservation. This design features the denomination shown as "25¢" instead of "Quarter Dollar" used on all other previous designs.[34] Renata Gordon[34] Emily Damstra[34] March 27, 2023 TBD TBD TBD TBD
8 Eleanor Roosevelt Roosevelt stands by the scales of justice in front of a representation of the globe, above the inscription "Universal Declaration of Human Rights".[35] Craig Campbell[35] Don Everhart[35] June 5, 2023 TBD TBD TBD TBD
9 Jovita Idár Idar standing with her hands clasped. Her body is made up of inscriptions representing her accomplishments and the newspapers for which she wrote.[36] John P. McGraw[36] August 14, 2023 TBD TBD TBD TBD
10 Maria Tallchief Maria Tallchief spotlit in balletic pose. Her Osage name, 𐓏𐓘𐓸𐓮𐓟-𐓍𐓪͘𐓬𐓘, which translates to "Two Standards", is written in Osage orthography.[37] Joseph Menna[37] Benjamin Sowards[37] October 23, 2023 TBD TBD TBD TBD
2024

[38]

11 Patsy Mink TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD
12 Mary Edwards Walker TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD
13 Pauli Murray TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD
14 Zitkala-Ša TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD
15 Celia Cruz[39] TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD
2025 16 TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD
17 TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD
18 TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD
19 TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD
20 TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Circulating Collectible Coin Redesign Act of 2020 signed by president". CoinWorld. Retrieved 2021-01-16.
  2. ^ Lee, Barbara (2021-01-13). "Text - H.R.1923 - 116th Congress (2019-2020): Circulating Collectible Coin Redesign Act of 2020". congress.gov. Retrieved 2021-01-16.
  3. ^ Fischer, Debra; Masto, Catherine Cortez. "American women who shaped history are coming soon to quarters, just like George Washington". USA Today. Retrieved 2021-03-13.
  4. ^ "As Part of Women's History Month, Reps. Lee & Gonzalez Lead Bipartisan Effort to Issue Quarters Honoring Prominent American Women | Barbara Lee - Congresswoman for the 13th District of California". lee.house.gov. Retrieved 2021-01-16.
  5. ^ Wattles, Jackie (2018-03-15). "Lawmakers push to put women on quarters". CNNMoney. Retrieved 2021-01-16.
  6. ^ "Interview with Todd Martin of the United States Mint | Coin Update". news.coinupdate.com. Retrieved 2021-02-03.
  7. ^ "Gonzalez bill to honor American women on the quarter passes U.S. House of Representatives". U.S. Representative Anthony Gonzalez. 2020-09-23. Archived from the original on 2020-09-27. Retrieved 2021-01-16.
  8. ^ "Monday Morning Brief for Oct. 5, 2020: Too ambitious?". CoinWorld. Retrieved 2021-01-16.
  9. ^ Golino, Louis (2021-01-28). "The Coin Analyst: Have Circulating Commemorative Programs Outlasted Their Welcome?". CoinWeek. Retrieved 2021-02-03.
  10. ^ "Fraser portrait to finally debut on quarter in 2022". CoinWorld. Retrieved 2021-04-25.
  11. ^ Pietsch, Bryan (May 9, 2021). "Maya Angelou and Sally Ride Will Be Honored on Quarters". The New York Times. Retrieved May 19, 2021.
  12. ^ "American Women Quarters Program | U.S. Mint". www.usmint.gov. 12 April 2021. Retrieved 2021-04-16.
  13. ^ "Notable Women Will Be Honored On U.S. Quarters". NPR. Associated Press. 2021-06-17. Retrieved 2021-09-24.
  14. ^ Meredith, Stephanie (2023-01-25). "American Women Quarters: 2022 In Review | U.S. Mint". United States Mint. Retrieved 2023-02-21.
  15. ^ Franklin, Jonathan (2022-01-10). "The poet Maya Angelou is the first Black woman to be featured on a U.S. quarter". NPR. Retrieved 2022-03-04.
  16. ^ a b White, Katie (2022-01-17). "Maya Angelou Is the First Black Woman to Appear on the U.S. Quarter. We Asked Its Designer to Walk Us Through Its Symbolism". Artnet News. Retrieved 2022-05-28.
  17. ^ "Oprah Reacts to Holding the Maya Angelou Quarter for the First Time". Oprah Daily. 2022-01-24. Retrieved 2022-05-28.
  18. ^ Brandon, Elissaveta M. (2022-01-26). "The fascinating design story behind the new Maya Angelou quarters". Fast Company. Retrieved 2022-05-28.
  19. ^ "Sally Ride will become first out LGBTQ person on US currency". Metro Weekly. 2021-10-18. Retrieved 2022-03-04.
  20. ^ "The new Sally Ride quarter has a lot of symbolism – Sally Ride Science". sallyridescience.ucsd.edu. Retrieved 2022-05-28.
  21. ^ Isaac, O'Dell (6 April 2022). "U.S. Mint unveils Sally Ride quarter at Space Symposium in Colorado Springs". Colorado Springs Gazette. Retrieved 2022-05-28.
  22. ^ Staff, Callie Morris, KTUL (2022-05-21). "Wilma Mankiller quarter to be released during ceremony in Cherokee Nation". KTUL. Retrieved 2022-05-28.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  23. ^ "These Queer Icons Will Be the First LGBTQ+ People Featured on U.S. Currency". them. 2021-10-12. Retrieved 2022-03-04.
  24. ^ a b "2023 American Women Quarters™ Program Honorees Announced | U.S. Mint". www.usmint.gov. Retrieved 2022-03-30.
  25. ^ "$1 coin, quarter celebrate legendary Osage ballerina". KOSU. 2023-02-20. Retrieved 2023-02-21.
  26. ^ a b c d e "United States Mint Announces Designs for 2022 American Women Quarters™ Program Coins" (Press release). United States Mint. October 6, 2021. Retrieved October 9, 2021.
  27. ^ a b "Maya Angelou Quarter | American Women Quarters | U.S. Mint". United States Mint. Retrieved 2022-12-13.
  28. ^ "American Women QuartersTM Program" (Press release). Federal Reserve Bank. 2022-01-10. Retrieved 2022-01-11.
  29. ^ a b "Sally Ride Quarter | American Women Quarters | U.S. Mint". United States Mint. Retrieved 2022-12-13.
  30. ^ a b "Wilma Mankiller Quarter | American Women Quarters | U.S. Mint". United States Mint. Retrieved 2022-12-13.
  31. ^ a b "Nina Otero-Warren Quarter | American Women Quarters | U.S. Mint". United States Mint. Retrieved 2022-12-13.
  32. ^ a b "Anna May Wong Quarter | American Women Quarters | U.S. Mint". United States Mint. Retrieved 2022-12-13.
  33. ^ a b c "Bessie Coleman Quarter | American Women Quarters | U.S. Mint". United States Mint. Retrieved 2022-12-13.
  34. ^ a b c "Edith Kanakaʻole Quarter | American Women Quarters | U.S. Mint". United States Mint. Retrieved 2022-12-13.
  35. ^ a b c "Eleanor Roosevelt Quarter | American Women Quarters | U.S. Mint". United States Mint. Retrieved 2022-12-13.
  36. ^ a b "Jovita Idar Quarter | American Women Quarters | U.S. Mint". United States Mint. Retrieved 2022-12-13.
  37. ^ a b c "Maria Tallchief Quarter | American Women Quarters | U.S. Mint". United States Mint. Retrieved 2022-12-13.
  38. ^ "2024 American Women Quarters™ Program Honorees Announced". United States Mint. Retrieved 2023-02-02.
  39. ^ Valdivia, Pablo (February 7, 2023). "Queen of salsa Celia Cruz will be the first Afro Latina to appear on a U.S. quarter". NPR.

External links[edit]