Albanese ministry

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Albanese ministry

73rd ministry of Australia
photograph of Albanese
Anthony Albanese
Date formed23 May 2022
People and organisations
Monarch
Governor-GeneralDavid Hurley
Prime MinisterAnthony Albanese
Deputy Prime MinisterRichard Marles
No. of ministers30 (plus 12 Assistant Ministers and 4 Special Envoys)
Member partyLabor
Status in legislatureMajority government
77 / 151
Opposition cabinetDutton Shadow Cabinet
Opposition partyLiberalNational coalition[a]
Opposition leaderPeter Dutton
History
Election(s)21 May 2022
Legislature term(s)47th
PredecessorSecond Morrison ministry

The Albanese ministry is the 73rd ministry of the Government of Australia. It is led by the country's 31st Prime Minister, Anthony Albanese. The Albanese ministry succeeded the second Morrison ministry, which resigned on 23 May 2022 following the federal election that took place on 21 May which saw Labor defeat Scott Morrison's LiberalNational Coalition.[1]

Although counting was still underway on election night, most media outlets projected that due to severe losses by Morrison's Liberal/National Coalition, Labor was the only party that could realistically form even a minority government. Accordingly, Morrison conceded defeat to Albanese late on election night. Soon afterward, in accordance with longstanding Australian constitutional practice, he advised the Governor-General, David Hurley, that he was no longer in a position to govern. Normally, Morrison would have stayed on as caretaker Prime Minister until the final results were known. However, with the Quadrilateral Security Dialogue due to be held on 24 May 2022, Albanese advised Hurley that he could form a government. Hurley then swore in Albanese and four senior Labor frontbenchers as an interim five-person ministry on 23 May, two days after the election. According to ABC News, Hurley would not have invited Albanese to form a government without assurances that Labor could provide stable government, as well as legal advice that this was the proper course of action.[2][3] According to the Australian Financial Review, Albanese had secured enough support from crossbenchers to be able to govern in the event Labor fell short of a majority.[4] On 30 May 2022, Australian media outlets projected that Labor had won enough seats in the House of Representatives to become a majority government.[5]

After the swearing-in of the interim arrangement, during his first press conference as prime minister, Albanese announced that his full ministry would be sworn in on 1 June 2022.[6] The members of the ministry were announced on 31 May and sworn in the following day. As Labor frontbenchers Kristina Keneally and Terri Butler lost their seats in the election, Clare O'Neil and Murray Watt were chosen by the caucus as replacements to the cabinet.[7]

Current arrangement[edit]

Albanese announced the composition of the full ministry on 31 May 2022.[8][9][10] The ministry was sworn in on 1 June 2022.[11]

Cabinet[edit]

Party Faction[12][13] Minister Portrait Portfolio
  Labor Left Hon Anthony Albanese
(born 1963)

MP for Grayndler
(1996–)

  Right Hon Richard Marles
(born 1967)

MP for Corio
(2007–)

  Left Hon Penny Wong
(born 1968)

Senator for South Australia
(2002–)

  Right Hon Dr Jim Chalmers
(born 1978)

MP for Rankin
(2013–)

  Left Hon Katy Gallagher
(born 1970)

Senator for Australian Capital Territory
(2019–)

  Right Hon Don Farrell
(born 1954)

Senator for South Australia
(2016-)

  Hon Tony Burke
(born 1969)

MP for Watson
(2004–)

  Left Hon Mark Butler
(born 1970)

MP for Hindmarsh
(2019–)

  Right Hon Chris Bowen
(born 1973)

MP for McMahon
(2010–)

  Left Hon Tanya Plibersek
(born 1969)

MP for Sydney
(1998–)

  Hon Catherine King
(born 1966)

MP for Ballarat
(2001–)

  Right Hon Amanda Rishworth
(born 1978)

MP for Kingston
(2007–)

  Hon Bill Shorten
(born 1967)

MP for Maribyrnong
(2007–)

  Left Hon Linda Burney
(born 1957)

MP for Barton
(2016–)

  Right Hon Mark Dreyfus KC
(born 1956)

MP for Isaacs
(2007–)

  Left Hon Brendan O'Connor
(born 1962)

MP for Gorton
(2004–)

  Right Hon Jason Clare
(born 1972)

MP for Blaxland
(2007–)

  Left Hon Julie Collins
(born 1971)

MP for Franklin
(2007–)

  Right Hon Michelle Rowland
(born 1971)

MP for Greenway
(2010–)

  Hon Madeleine King
(born 1973)

MP for Brand
(2016–)

  Left Hon Murray Watt
(born 1973)

Senator for Queensland
(2016–)

  Right Hon Ed Husic
(born 1970)

MP for Chifley
(2010–)

  Hon Clare O'Neil
(born 1980)

MP for Hotham
(2013-)

Outer ministry[edit]

Party Minister Portrait Portfolio
  Labor Hon Matt Keogh
(born 1981)

MP for Burt
(2016–)

  Hon Pat Conroy
(born 1979)

MP for Shortland
(2016–)

  Hon Stephen Jones
(born 1965)

MP for Whitlam
(2016–)

  Hon Andrew Giles
(born 1973)

MP for Scullin
(2013–)

  Hon Dr Anne Aly
(born 1967)

MP for Cowan
(2016–)

  Hon Anika Wells
(born 1985)

MP for Lilley
(2019–)

  Hon Kristy McBain
(born 1982)

MP for Eden-Monaro
(2020–)

Assistant ministry[edit]

Party Minister Portrait Portfolio
  Labor Patrick Gorman
(born 1984)

MP for Perth
(2018–)

  • Assistant Minister to the Prime Minister
  • Assistant Minister for the Public Service
  Hon Justine Elliot
(born 1967)

MP for Richmond
(2004–)

  • Assistant Minister for Social Services
  • Assistant Minister for the Prevention of Family Violence
  Hon Matt Thistlethwaite
(born 1972)

MP for Kingsford Smith
(2013–)

  • Assistant Minister for Defence
  • Assistant Minister for Veterans' Affairs
  • Assistant Minister for the Republic
  Hon Dr Andrew Leigh
(born 1972)

MP for Fenner
(2016–)

  • Assistant Minister for Competition, Charities and Treasury
  • Assistant Minister for Employment
  Jenny McAllister
(born 1973)

Senator for New South Wales
(2015–)

  • Assistant Minister for Climate Change and Energy
  Carol Brown
(born 1963)

Senator for Tasmania
(2005–)

  • Assistant Minister for Infrastructure and Transport
  Ged Kearney
(born 1963)

MP for Cooper
(2019–)

  • Assistant Minister for Health and Aged Care
  Emma McBride
(born 1975)

MP for Dobell
(2016–)

  • Assistant Minister for Mental Health and Suicide Prevention
  • Assistant Minister for Rural and Regional Health
  Malarndirri McCarthy
(born 1970)

Senator for the Northern Territory
(2016–)

  • Assistant Minister for Indigenous Australians
  • Assistant Minister for Indigenous Health
  Tim Ayres
(born 1973)

Senator for New South Wales
(2019–)

  • Assistant Minister for Trade
  • Assistant Minister for Manufacturing
  Anthony Chisholm
(born 1978)

Senator for Queensland
(2016–)

  • Assistant Minister for Education
  • Assistant Minister for Regional Development
  • Deputy Manager of Government Business in the Senate
  Tim Watts
(born 1982)

MP for Gellibrand
(2013–)

  • Assistant Minister for Foreign Affairs

Special envoys[edit]

Special envoys are additional roles that are not part of the ministry, but have been included here because of their status.[9]

Party Minister Portrait Portfolio
  Labor Pat Dodson
(born 1948)

Senator for Western Australia
(2016–2024)

Nita Green
(born 1983)

Senator for Queensland
(2019–)

Susan Templeman
(born 1963)

MP for Macquarie
(2016–)

  • Special Envoy for the Arts
Tony Sheldon
(born 1961)

Senator for New South Wales
(2019–)

  • Special Envoy for Disaster Recovery (from 24 July 2022)[14]

Initial arrangement[edit]

In the interim five-person ministry sworn in on 23 May 2022, Albanese was sworn in as Prime Minister, Labor deputy leader Richard Marles as Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Employment, Jim Chalmers as Treasurer, Senator Penny Wong as Minister for Foreign Affairs, and Senator Katy Gallagher as Minister for Finance, Minister for Women, Attorney-General, and Vice-President of the Executive Council.[1] Gallagher would only hold the position of attorney-general for the duration of the interim ministry.[15] The interim ministry would also cover all other portfolios and the sworn-in ministers would be acting ministers for those portfolios. For example, Gallagher and Chalmers were also acting health minister[16] and interim home affairs minister respectively.[17]

Party Minister Portrait Portfolio
  Labor Hon Anthony Albanese
(1963–)

MP for Grayndler
(1996–)

  Hon Richard Marles
(1967–)

MP for Corio
(2007–)

  Hon Penny Wong
(1968–)

Senator for South Australia
(2002–)

  Hon Dr Jim Chalmers
(1978–)

MP for Rankin
(2013–)

  Hon Katy Gallagher
(1970–)

Senator for Australian Capital Territory
(2019–)

Geographical breakdown[edit]

Geographic breakdown of the current ministry, per House of Representatives electorate and state/territory represented in the Senate:

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The Coalition also includes the LNP and the Country Liberal Party

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Albanese ministry" (PDF). Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet. 23 May 2022.
  2. ^ "Five Labor MPs to be immediately sworn in first ahead of key Quad trip". Sky News. 21 May 2022. Retrieved 22 May 2022.
  3. ^ "Anthony Albanese and four senior frontbenchers sworn in ahead of Quad trip". ABC News. 23 May 2022.
  4. ^ Tillet, Andrew (23 May 2022). "Albanese woos crossbench as insurance as he inches towards majority". Australian Financial Review. Retrieved 24 May 2022.
  5. ^ Worthington, Brett (30 May 2022). "Anthony Albanese and Labor to form majority government with projected win in Macnamara". ABC News. Retrieved 30 May 2022.
  6. ^ "Press Conference - Parliament House, Canberra | Prime Minister of Australia". Prime Minister of Australia. Retrieved 23 May 2022.
  7. ^ "Anthony Albanese's first ministry brings housing and NDIS portfolios into cabinet, but veterans affairs removed". ABC News. 31 May 2022.
  8. ^ "Anthony Albanese's full ministry list of cabinet, outer ministry and assistant ministers for 47th Australian parliament". Canberra Times. 31 May 2022.
  9. ^ a b "Press Conference". Prime Minister of Australia. 31 May 2022.
  10. ^ "Albanese ministry" (PDF). Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet. 1 June 2022.
  11. ^ Shiloh Payne (1 June 2022). "Federal election live: New Labor ministry sworn in as vote counting winds down". ABC News.
  12. ^ James Massola (14 February 2021). "What are Labor's factions and who's who in the Left and Right?". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 7 June 2022.
  13. ^ Katharine Murphy (31 May 2022). "Anthony Albanese's ministry contains more surprises than expected following a factional kerfuffle". Guardian Australia. Retrieved 7 June 2022.
  14. ^ Albanese, Anthony. "Statement on new Special Envoy for Disaster Recovery". Prime Minister of Australia. Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet.
  15. ^ "Who are the other four Labor ministers sworn in on Monday?". ABC News. 23 May 2022.
  16. ^ "ATAGI expands COVID-19 booster access to allow more people to get a fourth dose". ABC News. 25 May 2022.
  17. ^ "Jim Chalmers indicates 'substantial progress' on returning Murugappan family to Biloela". The Guardian. 25 May 2022.