A. J. Mleczko

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A. J. Mleczko
Born (1975-06-14) June 14, 1975 (age 48)
Nantucket, Massachusetts, U.S.
Height 5 ft 11 in (180 cm)
Weight 160 lb (73 kg; 11 st 6 lb)
Position Forward
Played for Harvard
National team  United States
Playing career 1993–2002
Medal record
Representing  United States
Women's ice hockey
Olympic Games
Gold medal – first place 1998 Nagano Tournament
Silver medal – second place 2002 Salt Lake City Tournament
IIHF World Women's Championships
Silver medal – second place 1997 Canada Tournament
Silver medal – second place 2000 Canada Tournament
Silver medal – second place 2001 United States Tournament

Allison Jaime "A. J." Mleczko Griswold (born June 14, 1975) is an American ice hockey player and analyst. She won a gold medal at the 1998 Winter Olympics and a silver medal at the 2002 Winter Olympics.

Playing career[edit]

Mleczko attended New Canaan Country School and is a graduate of The Taft School in Watertown, Connecticut. Mleczko played college hockey at Harvard University, where she led the Crimson to a national title in 1999.[1] That same year she became the second winner of the Patty Kazmaier Award, which is awarded annually to the best female college ice hockey player in the United States.[2] On September 24, 2002, she was inducted into the New England Women's Hall of Fame.[1]

Mleczko was inducted on June 20, 2019, into the National Polish-American Sports Hall of Fame located in Troy, Michigan. Her paternal great-grandparents were Polish immigrants.[3]

Broadcasting career[edit]

She is the #2 color commentator for ESPN/ABC, teaming with Bob Wischusen and Leah Hextall.[4] and MSG Networks NHL broadcasts.[5] She previously worked for the NHL on NBC, where she became the first woman to commentate for an NHL game, including playoffs.[6][7][8][9][10] Additionally, she hosts the On the Bus With Cammi & AJ podcast with former teammate Cammi Granato.[11] Furthermore, she also called five women's hockey at the Winter Olympic games for NBC Sports.[12][13]

Personal life[edit]

Mleczko currently resides in Concord, Massachusetts with her husband, Jason, and their four children.[9] She is a cousin of diplomat Rufus Gifford.[14]

Career statistics[edit]

Career statistics are from Eliteprospects.com, or The Internet Hockey Database, or USA Hockey, or the Harvard Crimson,[15] or the 2000 United States Women's National Team Media Guide [16]

Regular season and playoffs[edit]

Regular season Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1989-90 Connecticut Polar Bears 19U 19U AAA (W)
1995-96 Harvard Univserity
1996-97 Harvard University
1997-98 Harvard University AWCHA
1998-99 Harvard University AWCHA 34 37 77 114
NCAA totals 128 129 257

International[edit]

Year Team Event Result   GP G A Pts PIM
1995 USA Pacific Rim Championship 2nd place, silver medalist(s) 5 1 1 2
1996 USA Pacific Rim Championship 2nd place, silver medalist(s) 5 2 4 6
1996 USA 3 Nations Cup 2nd place, silver medalist(s) 5 1 0 1
1997 USA WC 2nd place, silver medalist(s) 5 0 2 2
1997 USA 3 Nations Cup 1st place, gold medalist(s) 5 2 0 2
1998 USA OG 1st place, gold medalist(s) 6 2 2 4 4
2000 USA WC 2nd place, silver medalist(s) 5 1 7 8 2
2001 USA WC 2nd place, silver medalist(s) 5 1 2 3 2
2002 USA OG 2nd place, silver medalist(s) 5 1 3 4 6
Senior totals 46 11 21 32

Awards and honors[edit]

  • 1999 American Women's College Hockey Alliance All-Americans, First Team[17]
  • Patty Kazmaier Award
  • 1999 USA Hockey Women's Player of the Year Award (also known as the Bob Allen Women's Player of the Year award) [18]
  • Women's Beanpot Hall of Fame (inducted 2011)[19]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b DateSeptember 19, 2002 (2002-09-19). "Newsmakers – Harvard Gazette". News.harvard.edu. Retrieved 2018-04-22.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: numeric names: authors list (link)
  2. ^ "A. J. Mleczko Bio, Stats, and Results | Olympics at". Sports-reference.com. Archived from the original on 2020-04-17. Retrieved 2018-04-22.
  3. ^ "Allison "AJ" Mleczko – NPASHF". Retrieved 2020-01-25.
  4. ^ "AJ Mleczko". ESPN Press Room U.S. Retrieved 2023-04-04.
  5. ^ "AJ Mleczko-Griswold Brings Custom Bus to Islanders Tailgate". NHL.com. 24 March 2019. Retrieved 2023-04-04.
  6. ^ "AJ MLECZKO TO SERVE AS GAME ANALYST FOR NBC SPORTS' NHL COVERAGE ON MARCH 6, FEATURING THE DETROIT RED WINGS AND BOSTON BRUINS ON NBCSN". NBC Sports Pressbox. 2018-02-22. Retrieved 2023-04-04.
  7. ^ "U.S. Olympic gold medalist AJ Mleczko to do color analysis for NHL game". USA TODAY. Retrieved 2023-04-04.
  8. ^ "2018 Stanley Cup Playoffs - AJ Mleczko making her mark as first woman to work as in-booth analyst in NHL playoff history". www.secsports.com. Retrieved 2023-04-04.
  9. ^ a b "AJ Mleczko". MSGNetworks.com. Retrieved 2020-01-25.
  10. ^ "AJ Mleczko". NBC Sports Pressbox. 2018-02-01. Retrieved 2019-01-15.
  11. ^ "On The Bus With Cammi & AJ on Apple Podcasts". Apple Podcasts. Retrieved 2021-05-11.
  12. ^ "USA-CANADA WOMEN'S HOCKEY GOLD MEDAL GAME TO AIR LIVE ON WEDNESDAY AT 11:05 PM ET ON NBC AND PEACOCK". NBC Sports Pressbox. 2022-02-15. Retrieved 2023-04-04.
  13. ^ "NBC OLYMPICS ANNOUNCES HOCKEY COMMENTARY TEAMS FOR COVERAGE OF THE XXIV OLYMPIC WINTER GAMES". Sports Media News. 2022-02-02. Retrieved 2023-04-04.
  14. ^ "On The Bus With Cammi & AJ: Rufus Gifford - Former US Ambassador to Denmark & Deputy Campaign Manager for President Joe Biden on Apple Podcasts". Apple Podcasts. Retrieved 2021-05-11.
  15. ^ "A.J. Mleczko '97-'99 | News | The Harvard Crimson". www.thecrimson.com. Retrieved 2024-01-05.
  16. ^ "2000 United States Women's National Team Media Guide" (PDF). Team USA Media Guide. p. 34. Retrieved 4 January 2024.
  17. ^ "American Hockey Coaches Association". Ahcahockey.com. 1997-07-08. Archived from the original on 2011-07-07. Retrieved 2018-04-22.
  18. ^ "Annual Awards - Through the Years". USA Hockey. Archived from the original on 13 January 2010. Retrieved 24 June 2010.
  19. ^ "Women's Beanpot: Hall of Fame". Beanpothockey.com. Archived from the original on 2018-10-29. Retrieved 2018-04-22.

External links[edit]

Awards and achievements
Preceded by Patty Kazmaier Award
1998–99
Succeeded by