2020 Women's March

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2020 Women's March
Part of the Women's rights movement and protests against Donald Trump
San Francisco Women's March 20200118-9139.jpg
San Francisco
DateJanuary 18, 2020
Location
United States
MethodsProtest march

The 2020 Women's March was a double protest that was held on January 18 and October 17, 2020, in Washington, D.C. and across the United States.[1][2] Many people in countries around the world also participated in the women's global march.[3] The demonstration follows similar protests in 2017, 2018, and 2019.[4]

Overview[edit]

In 2020, the annual Women's March was held on January 18, and on October 17 a second march was held due to the death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. The first Women's March 2020 may not have had as much attention and was focused around grassroot campaigns,[5] whereas the second Women's March 2020 had more attention and greater focus towards the 2020 presidential election and the opposition towards the Supreme Court Nomination process of Amy Coney Barrett.[2]

First Women's March of 2020 (January 18, 2020)[edit]

The first Women's March 2020 on January 18, 2020, was held based on three themes: reproductive rights, immigration, and climate change. While these were the three themes for the 2020 Women's March, it was followed by the slogan “Women Rising."[6] The Washington, DC march had about 10,000 attendees, which was a lower turnout in comparison to marches held in previous years.[7][8] The DC march culminated with a moment of silence along with chanting a performance of a Chilean feminist anthem, A Rapist in your Path, which sends a message of denouncing violence against women and a patriarchal state.[9][8] There were also about 180 cities that participated in the event as well by planning their own protests. In comparison to previous marches, the focus of the first march was more on grassroot campaigns and less on celebrities and prominent figures.[7] Board members wanted the march to be more issue-driven for the activists, and decided to hold small-scale events throughout the week leading up to the march in January 2020.[6]

Second Women's March of 2020 (October 17, 2020)[edit]

Events that Led up to the Second Women's March of 2020[edit]

The second Women's March 2020 was held on October 17, 2020, due to the passing of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on September 18, 2020, less than eight weeks away from the presidential election. Even as the Women's March organization held a vigil in Washington, D.C. to honor the late justice, President Donald Trump intended to fill Ginsburg's seat before the 2020 election with the appointment of Amy Coney Barrett.[10] There would be a conservative advantage on the Supreme Court with Amy Coney Barrett on the court.[10] The Women's March Organization, in partnership with the We Demand More Coalition, organized this march with the intent to send a clear message to the Trump administration about his agenda with regard to judicial appointments, especially with the possibility of Roe V Wade being overturned if Amy Coney Barrett were to pass the GOP-controlled senate and officially join the Supreme Court.[11][12] Some of the many rights at stake under a Justice Barrett would include abortion rights, LGBTQ rights, and voting rights.[13]

Goals of the Second Women's March[edit]

A lot of the focus of this march was towards the 2020 election, especially with opposition towards Donald Trump and the support of his Democratic opponent Joe Biden.[14] At the time of Ginsburg's death, early voting both by mail and in person had already started in several states like Virginia and Minnesota. Along with voter outreach for the 2020 election, the organizers not only wanted to register voters for the upcoming election, but also inform voters about the Women's rights and Feminist agenda for the 2020 election and the impacts of what was at stake thereof.[14] The organizers of this march also wanted to show the power a women's vote can have along with the push towards progressive agendas and candidates.[13] As before earlier in 2020, once again there were about 10,000 people that attended the march in Washington DC; that same day, the number of planned events across the country (in all 50 states) rose to 400, with an anticipated 70,000 participants.[2][14][13] At the end of the march, a text-a-thon was held to encourage voters, especially in swing states, to go out and vote prior to and during the November 3rd election, with the goal of uniting women for the same purpose. The Women's March was highly encouraged women to vote, that they also partnered with voter registration organizations.[12] Even though a lot of the marchers were white women, the organizers' goal was to build an activism movement and have a better focus towards multiracial women.[13]

COVID-19 implications[edit]

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, lower turnouts were expected due to the older demographics of those who had become regular participants of Women's Marches. Precautions were put in place with the organizers asking everyone to social distance and wear face coverings when attending these marches. Organizers of the Second Women's March advised against people with COVID-19 symptoms from attending in person; they also advised people to, if possible, stick with local marches instead of traveling to Washington DC.[15] The Women's March Organization also held virtual events on the same day as the march along with car caravans for those who couldn't attend the march, with the focus towards voting rights and opposition against the Supreme Court confirmation process of Amy Coney Barrett.[12][2][15]

Locations[edit]

United States[edit]

California[edit]

Canada[edit]

Several communities in Canada held Women's March events on January 18, 2020.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Marissa J. Lang; Samantha Schmidt (January 17, 2020). "Women's March protesters in D.C. and across the country pledge it's only the beginning". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on January 18, 2020. Retrieved January 18, 2020.
  2. ^ a b c d Schmidt, Samantha. "Women's March plans return to D.C. in October to protest Supreme Court nomination". Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Archived from the original on 2020-10-03. Retrieved 2020-10-04.
  3. ^ "Women's March Global | Home". Women's March Global. Archived from the original on 2020-01-27. Retrieved 2020-01-27.
  4. ^ Doug Stanglin; Joshua Bote; Grace Hauck (January 18, 2020). "Women's March draws thousands, brings 'renewed energy' to start new decade: 'We are not resting'". USA Today. Archived from the original on January 18, 2020. Retrieved January 18, 2020.
  5. ^ Ortiz, Jorge L. "'Women rising' but numbers falling: 2020 March tries to re-energize amid flagging enthusiasm". USA TODAY. Archived from the original on 2020-10-18. Retrieved 2020-10-04.
  6. ^ a b Ortiz, Jorge L. "'Women rising' but numbers falling: 2020 March tries to re-energize amid flagging enthusiasm". USA TODAY. Archived from the original on 2021-09-30. Retrieved 2021-09-24.
  7. ^ a b Ortiz, Jorge L. "'Women rising' but numbers falling: 2020 March tries to re-energize amid flagging enthusiasm". USA TODAY. Archived from the original on 2020-10-18. Retrieved 2020-10-04.
  8. ^ a b "Thousands take to streets for 4th Women's March". WTOP. 2020-01-18. Archived from the original on 2020-11-28. Retrieved 2020-10-04.
  9. ^ "Women's March Draws A Smaller, But Passionate Crowd". NPR.org. Archived from the original on 2020-10-09. Retrieved 2020-10-04.
  10. ^ a b "Women's March in D.C. draws thousands in protest of Supreme Court nominee, Trump". Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Archived from the original on 2021-01-09. Retrieved 2021-09-24.
  11. ^ Pitofsky, Marina (2020-09-22). "Women's March planned for October to protest Trump filling Ginsburg's Supreme Court seat". TheHill. Archived from the original on 2020-10-30. Retrieved 2020-10-04.
  12. ^ a b c Shacknai, Gabby. "Everything You Need To Know About The October 17 Women's March". Forbes. Archived from the original on 2020-10-04. Retrieved 2020-10-04.
  13. ^ a b c d North, Anna (2020-10-17). "In 2017, women marched against Trump. Now they're marching to get rid of him". Vox. Archived from the original on 2020-10-20. Retrieved 2020-10-20.
  14. ^ a b c "Women's Marches Bring Thousands To Washington, D.C., And Cities Nationwide". NPR.org. Archived from the original on 2020-10-20. Retrieved 2020-10-20.
  15. ^ a b Schmidt, Samantha; Tan, Rebecca; Svrluga, Susan. "Women's March in D.C. draws thousands in protest of Supreme Court nominee, Trump". Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Archived from the original on 2020-10-20. Retrieved 2020-10-20.
  16. ^ "Women's March Chicago expected to draw thousands to Grant Park in support of women's right and civil liberties". ABC7 Chicago. January 18, 2020. Archived from the original on January 18, 2020. Retrieved January 18, 2020.
  17. ^ Tony Keith (January 17, 2020). "'Womxn's' March, formally the Women's March, scheduled for Jan. 25 in Colorado Springs". KKTV-11. Archived from the original on January 18, 2020. Retrieved January 18, 2020.
  18. ^ Breaking News Staff (January 18, 2020). "Dayton Women's March scheduled for this afternoon". Dayton Daily News. Archived from the original on January 18, 2020. Retrieved January 18, 2020.
  19. ^ Taylor Perse (January 16, 2020). "The Informal Women's March". Eugene Weekly. Archived from the original on January 18, 2020. Retrieved January 18, 2020.
  20. ^ Brinley Hineman (January 15, 2020). "2020 Women's March in Murfreesboro: Workshops, training sessions and more". Murfreesboro Daily News Journal. Archived from the original on January 18, 2020. Retrieved January 18, 2020.
  21. ^ Oona Goodin-Smith (January 17, 2020). "With 2020 election, Women's March on Philadelphia 'more important now than ever,' organizers say". The Philadelphia Inquirer. Archived from the original on January 17, 2020. Retrieved January 18, 2020.
  22. ^ Annie McCormick (January 18, 2020). "2020 Women's March on Philadelphia goes on in snow". 6-ABC. Archived from the original on January 19, 2020. Retrieved January 18, 2020.
  23. ^ Chris Bolt (January 17, 2020). "Seneca Falls Women's March Expecting Thousands for Equal Rights, to Honor 100th Suffrage Anniversary". WAER 88.3. Archived from the original on January 18, 2020. Retrieved January 18, 2020.
  24. ^ Jayati Ramakrishnan (January 16, 2020). "Vancouver to host 2020 Women's March Saturday". The Oregonian. Archived from the original on January 17, 2020. Retrieved January 18, 2020.
  25. ^ a b c d e "Women's March 2020 kicks off across Bay Area". KRON4. January 18, 2020. Archived from the original on January 19, 2020. Retrieved January 18, 2020.
  26. ^ Brooke Staggs (January 15, 2020). "Here's the 2020 Women's March LA route, street closures and how to join in". Los Angeles Daily News. Archived from the original on October 14, 2021. Retrieved January 18, 2020.
  27. ^ Joey Reams; Brian Day (October 15, 2020). "Women's March Coming to Pasadena City Hall". Pasadena Now. Archived from the original on October 31, 2020. Retrieved October 20, 2020.
  28. ^ Pullen, Lauren (January 18, 2020). "Bitter cold doesn't stop Calgarians". Global News. Archived from the original on January 27, 2020. Retrieved January 26, 2020.
  29. ^ Hartill, Mary Beth (January 20, 2020). "Determined group of women's advocates brave Muskoka storm". MuskokaRegion.com. Archived from the original on January 27, 2020. Retrieved January 27, 2020.
  30. ^ Williams, Ethan (January 18, 2020). "'Still fighting': Women's March takes to Regina streets". CBC News. Archived from the original on January 20, 2020. Retrieved January 27, 2020.

External links[edit]