2016–17 NCAA Division I women's basketball season

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The 2016–17 NCAA Division I women's basketball season began on November 11, 2016 and ended with the Final Four title game in Dallas on April 2, 2017, won by South Carolina. Practices officially began on September 30, 2016.

Season headlines[edit]

Milestones and records[edit]

  • December 8 – In Ohio State's 108–73 win over Southern, the Buckeyes' Kelsey Mitchell became the fastest Division I women's player to reach 2,000 career points, reaching the mark in her 79th game. The previous record of 82 was held by Missouri State's Jackie Stiles.[11]
  • December 11 – Kelsey Plum became the all-time leading scorer in Pac-12 Conference history (for either women or men), passing the former record of Stanford's Chiney Ogwumike during Washington's 92–66 win over Boise State.[12][a]
  • December 16 – Baylor defeated Winthrop 140–32, setting a new Division I women's basketball record for victory margin.[13]
  • January 10 – UConn crushed South Florida 102–37 to give the Huskies their 90th straight win, equaling the program's own record for the longest winning streak by a Division I team of either sex.[14]
  • January 13 – Plum became the 12th player in Division I women's history with 3,000 career points during Washington's 90–73 win over Arizona.[15]
  • January 14 – UConn defeated SMU 88–48 for its 91st straight win, establishing a new Division I record streak.[16]
  • February 3 – Stanford defeated USC 58–42, giving Cardinal head coach Tara VanDerveer her 1,000th career win. She joined late Tennessee head coach Pat Summitt and current Duke men's head coach Mike Krzyzewski as the only Division I coaches at that time to reach the milestone.[17]
  • February 13 – UConn extended its record winning streak to 100 games with a 66–55 win over South Carolina.[18]
  • February 25 – Plum scored 57 points, a school record for either sex, in Washington's 84–77 win over Utah, surpassing Stiles for the top spot on the all-time NCAA Division I women's career scoring list.[19][b]
  • March 6 – In the American Athletic Conference tournament final, UConn's Katie Lou Samuelson made all 10 of her three-point attempts, setting a new women's Division I record for most consecutive three-pointers in a game. The Huskies blasted South Florida 100–44 to enter the NCAA Tournament unbeaten.[20]
  • March 18 – In the first round of the NCAA tournament, Texas A&M came back from a 21-point deficit early in the fourth quarter, ending on a 25–1 run to defeat Penn 63–61. This set a new record for largest comeback in the Division I women's tournament, surpassing the previous record of 16 points by Notre Dame in 2001 and Michigan State in 2005.[21]
  • March 19 – In the same round, Baylor set two all-time tournament records in its 119–30 pasting of Texas Southern:[22]
    • The 89-point margin was the largest ever, surpassing the previous record of 74 set by Tennessee against North Carolina A&T in 1994.
    • Baylor's 119 points were the most ever scored in regulation, surpassing the previous record of 116 set by Ohio State in 1998 and equaled twice by UConn, including earlier that same day.
  • March 21 – In the second round of the NCAA tournament, Plum surpassed Stiles' D-I record for points in a season, scoring 38 in the Huskies' 108–82 win over Oklahoma and finishing the game with 1,080 points on the season.[23] Plum eventually finished with 1,109 points on the season and 3,527 for her career.[24]
  • March 31 – UConn's record winning streak ended at 111 games with a 66–64 overtime loss to Mississippi State on a buzzer-beater by the Bulldogs' Morgan William.[25]

Coaching wins milestones[edit]

Conference membership changes[edit]

Only one school joined a new conference for 2016–17:

School Former conference New conference
Coastal Carolina Big South Conference Sun Belt Conference

Pre-season polls[edit]

The top 25 from the AP and USA Today Coaches Polls.

Associated Press
Ranking Team
1 Notre Dame (14)
2 Baylor (12)
3 Connecticut (6)
4 South Carolina (1)
5 Louisville
6 Maryland
7 Ohio State
8 Texas
9 UCLA
10 Mississippi State
11 Stanford
12 Florida State
13 Tennessee
14 Miami (FL)
15 Syracuse
16 Oklahoma
17 Washington
18 Arizona State
19 Kentucky
20 Florida
21 DePaul
22 West Virginia
23 Indiana
24 Missouri
25 Oregon State
USA Today Coaches
Ranking Team
1 Connecticut (18)
2 Notre Dame (8)
3 South Carolina (3)
4 Baylor (2)
5 Maryland
6 Ohio State
7 Texas (1)
8 Louisville
9 UCLA
10 Stanford
11 Mississippi State
12 Florida State
13 Syracuse
14 Tennessee
15 Washington
16 Arizona State
17 Oregon State
18 Oklahoma
19 Kentucky
20 Miami (FL)
21 DePaul
22 Michigan State
23 Texas A&M
24 Florida
25 West Virginia

New arenas[edit]

  • South Dakota opened the new Sanford Coyote Sports Center. The completion of the 6,000-seat venue saw the South Dakota men's basketball, women's basketball, and women's volleyball teams move out of the considerably larger DakotaDome, which remains home to football, track & field, and swimming & diving. The first women's basketball game in the new arena was the opening leg of a November 13 doubleheader with the men's team, with the Coyotes defeating Stephen F. Austin 80–74.[31]
  • North Dakota State opened the renovated Scheels Center. This completion brought the previously outdated Bison Sports Arena up to full Division 1 standards. The arena resumed competition of their men's basketball, women's basketball, and wrestling teams inside the Scheels Center. The renovated arena seats 5,700 people on the North side of NDSU's campus in Fargo, North Dakota. The first women's game played in the renovated arena was an exhibition on November 3, 2016 against NCAA Division II Bemidji State, the Bison winning that game 79-59.[32] The first official women's game was on November 12, 2016; the Bison beat Dickinson State University 70-63.[33]

In addition, Alabama returned women's home games to Coleman Coliseum, home to Alabama men's basketball since the venue's opening in 1968. The Crimson Tide women began play in 1974 at Foster Auditorium, and split home games between the two facilities until moving full-time into the Coliseum in 1981. The women would move back to Foster near the end of the 2010–11 season, and used that as their main venue until returning to the Coliseum.[34]

This proved to be the final season for four Division I teams in their then-current venues.

Regular season[edit]

Early preseason tournament[edit]

Tournament upsets[edit]

For this list, an "upset" is defined as a win by a team seeded 7 or more spots below its defeated opponent.

Date Winner Score Loser Region Round
March 18 Oregon (10) 71–70 Temple (7) Bridgeport Round of 64
March 18 Quinnipiac (12) 68–65 Marquette (5) Lexington Round of 64
March 20 Oregon (10) 74–65 Duke (2) Bridgeport Round of 32
March 20 Quinnipiac (12) 85–78 Miami (FL) (4) Bridgeport Round of 32
March 25 Oregon (10) 77–63 Maryland (2) Bridgeport Sweet Sixteen

Conference winners and tournaments[edit]

Each of the 32 Division I athletic conferences ends its regular season with a single-elimination tournament. The team with the best regular-season record in each conference is given the number one seed in each tournament, with tiebreakers used as needed in the case of ties for the top seeding. The winners of these tournaments receive automatic invitations to the 2017 NCAA Division I women's basketball tournament. This will be the first season in which the Ivy League holds a conference tournament.[39]

Conference Regular
season winner
Conference
player of the year
Conference
Coach of the Year
Conference
tournament
Tournament
venue (city)
Tournament
winner
America East Conference New Hampshire Carlie Pogue, New Hampshire[40] Maureen Magarity, New Hampshire[40] 2017 America East women's basketball tournament Campus sites Albany
American Athletic Conference UConn Napheesa Collier & Katie Lou Samuelson, UConn[41] Geno Auriemma, UConn & Tonya Cardoza, Temple[41] 2017 American Athletic Conference women's basketball tournament Mohegan Sun Arena
(Uncasville, CT)
UConn
ASUN Conference Stetson Brianti Saunders, Stetson[42] Lynn Bria, Stetson[42] 2017 ASUN women's basketball tournament Campus sites Florida Gulf Coast
Atlantic 10 Conference Dayton[c 1]
George Washington
Jackie Kemph, Saint Louis[43] Jeff Williams, La Salle[43] 2017 Atlantic 10 women's basketball tournament First round at campus sites
Remainder at Richmond Coliseum
(Richmond, VA)
Dayton
Atlantic Coast Conference Notre Dame Alexis Peterson, Syracuse[44] Wes Moore, NC State[44] 2017 ACC women's basketball tournament HTC Center
(Conway, SC)
Notre Dame
Big 12 Conference Baylor Brooke McCarty, Texas[45] Karen Aston, Texas[45] 2017 Big 12 Conference women's basketball tournament Chesapeake Energy Arena
(Oklahoma City, OK)
West Virginia
Big East Conference Creighton
DePaul[c 1]
Brooke Schulte, DePaul[46] Doug Bruno, DePaul[46] 2017 Big East women's basketball tournament Al McGuire Center
(Milwaukee, WI)
Marquette
Big Sky Conference Montana State
North Dakota
Peyton Ferris, Montana State [47] Travis Brewster, North Dakota[48] 2017 Big Sky Conference women's basketball tournament Reno Events Center
(Reno, NV)
Montana State
Big South Conference Radford Emma Bockrath, High Point[49] Ronny Fisher, Campbell[49] 2017 Big South Conference women's basketball tournament Vines Center
(Lynchburg, VA)
UNC Asheville
Big Ten Conference Maryland
Ohio State[c 1]
Kelsey Mitchell, Ohio State[50] Kim Barnes Arico, Michigan[50] 2017 Big Ten Conference women's basketball tournament Bankers Life Fieldhouse
(Indianapolis, IN)
Maryland
Big West Conference UC Davis Channon Fluker, Cal State Northridge[51] Jennifer Gross, UC Davis[51] 2017 Big West Conference women's basketball tournament First round/Quarterfinals at Walter Pyramid
(Long Beach, CA)
Remainder at Honda Center
(Anaheim, CA)
Long Beach State
Colonial Athletic Association Elon Precious Hall, James Madison[52] Charlotte Smith, Elon[52] 2017 CAA women's basketball tournament JMU Convocation Center
(Harrisonburg, VA)
Elon
Conference USA WKU Jennie Simms, Old Dominion[53] Joye Lee-McNelis, Southern Miss[53] 2017 Conference USA women's basketball tournament First round/Quarterfinals at Bartow Arena
(Birmingham, AL)
Remainder at Legacy Arena
(Birmingham, AL)
WKU
Horizon League Green Bay Mehryn Kraker, Green Bay[54] Katrina Merriweather, Wright State[54] 2017 Horizon League women's basketball tournament Joe Louis Arena
(Detroit, MI)
Green Bay
Ivy League Penn Michelle Nwokedi, Penn[55] Mike McLaughlin, Penn[55] 2017 Ivy League women's basketball tournament Palestra
(Philadelphia, PA)
Penn
Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference Quinnipiac Robin Perkins, Rider[56] Lynn Milligan, Rider[57] 2017 MAAC women's basketball tournament Times Union Center
(Albany, NY)
Quinnipiac
Mid-American Conference Kent State (East)
Central Michigan[c 1] (West)
Larissa Lurken, Kent State[58] Todd Starkey, Kent State[58] 2017 Mid-American Conference women's basketball tournament First round at campus sites
Remainder at Quicken Loans Arena
(Cleveland, OH)
Toledo
Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference Bethune–Cookman Te’Shya Heslip, Howard[59] Vanessa Blair-Lewis, Bethune–Cookman[59] 2017 MEAC women's basketball tournament Norfolk Scope
(Norfolk, VA)
Hampton
Missouri Valley Conference Drake Lizzy Wendell, Drake[60] Jennie Baranczyk, Drake[60] 2017 Missouri Valley Conference women's basketball tournament iWireless Center
(Moline, IL)
Drake
Mountain West Conference Colorado State Ellen Nystrom, Colorado State[61] Joe Legerski, Wyoming[61] 2017 Mountain West Conference women's basketball tournament Thomas & Mack Center
(Paradise, NV)
Boise State
Northeast Conference Robert Morris Anna Niki Stamolamprou, Robert Morris[62] Charlie Buscaglia, Robert Morris[62] 2017 Northeast Conference women's basketball tournament Campus sites Robert Morris
Ohio Valley Conference Belmont Tearra Banks, Austin Peay[63] Cameron Newbauer, Belmont[63] 2017 Ohio Valley Conference women's basketball tournament Nashville Municipal Auditorium
(Nashville, TN)
Belmont
Pac-12 Conference Oregon State Kelsey Plum, Washington[64][65] Scott Rueck, Oregon State[64][65] 2017 Pac-12 Conference women's basketball tournament KeyArena
(Seattle, WA)
Stanford
Patriot League Bucknell Claire DeBoer, Bucknell[66] Aaron Roussell, Bucknell[66] 2017 Patriot League women's basketball tournament Campus sites Bucknell
Southeastern Conference South Carolina A'ja Wilson, South Carolina[67] Robin Pingeton, Missouri[67] 2017 SEC women's basketball tournament Bon Secours Wellness Arena
(Greenville, SC)
South Carolina
Southern Conference Chattanooga[c 1]
Mercer
Kahlia Lawrence, Mercer[68] Trina Patterson, UNC Greensboro[68] 2017 Southern Conference women's basketball tournament U.S. Cellular Center
(Asheville, NC)
Chattanooga
Southland Conference Central Arkansas Taylor Ross, Stephen F. Austin[69] Sandra Rushing, Central Arkansas[69] 2017 Southland Conference women's basketball tournament Leonard E. Merrell Center
(Katy, TX)
Central Arkansas
Southwestern Athletic Conference Grambling State
Texas Southern
Britney Wright, Alabama State[70] Freddie Murray, Grambling State[70] 2017 SWAC women's basketball tournament Toyota Center
(Houston, TX)
Texas Southern
The Summit League Western Illinois Emily Clemens, Western Illinois[71] JD Gravina, Western Illinois[71] 2017 Summit League women's basketball tournament Denny Sanford PREMIER Center
(Sioux Falls, SD)
Western Illinois
Sun Belt Conference Little Rock Sharde' Collins, Little Rock[72] Joe Foley, Little Rock[72] 2017 Sun Belt Conference women's basketball tournament Lakefront Arena
(New Orleans, LA)
Troy
West Coast Conference Gonzaga Cassie Broadhead, BYU[73] Lisa Fortier, Gonzaga[73] 2017 West Coast Conference women's basketball tournament Orleans Arena
(Las Vegas, NV)
Gonzaga
Western Athletic Conference New Mexico State Moriah Mack, New Mexico State[74] Mark Trakh, New Mexico State[74] 2017 WAC women's basketball tournament Orleans Arena
(Las Vegas, NV)
New Mexico State
  1. ^ a b c d e Top seed in conference tournament.

Award winners[edit]

All-America teams[edit]

The NCAA has never recognized a consensus All-America team in women's basketball. This differs from the practice in men's basketball, in which the NCAA uses a combination of selections by the Associated Press (AP), the National Association of Basketball Coaches (NABC), the Sporting News, and the United States Basketball Writers Association (USBWA) to determine a consensus All-America team. The selection of a consensus team is possible because all four organizations select at least a first and second team, with only the USBWA not selecting a third team.

However, of the major selectors in women's basketball, only the AP divides its selections into separate teams. The women's counterpart to the NABC, the Women's Basketball Coaches Association (WBCA), selects a single 10-member (plus ties) team, as does the USBWA. The NCAA does not recognize Sporting News as an All-America selector in women's basketball.

Major player of the year awards[edit]

Major freshman of the year awards[edit]

Major coach of the year awards[edit]

Other major awards[edit]

Conference standings[edit]

2016–17 American Athletic Conference women's basketball standings
Conf Overall
Team W   L   PCT W   L   PCT
No. 1 UConn 16 0   1.000 36 1   .973
Temple 13 3   .813 24 8   .750
South Florida 11 5   .688 24 9   .727
UCF 9 7   .563 21 12   .636
SMU 7 9   .438 19 15   .559
Tulane 7 9   .438 18 15   .545
Cincinnati 7 9   .438 16 14   .533
Memphis 7 9   .438 14 16   .467
Tulsa 5 11   .313 10 21   .323
Houston 4 12   .250 12 19   .387
East Carolina 2 14   .125 11 19   .367
2017 The American Tournament winner
As of March 31, 2017
Rankings from AP poll
2016–17 America East Conference women's basketball standings
Conf Overall
Team W   L   PCT W   L   PCT
New Hampshire 15 1   .938 26 6   .813
Albany 12 4   .750 21 12   .636
UMBC 10 6   .625 15 16   .484
Maine 9 7   .563 18 16   .529
Binghamton 8 8   .500 13 17   .433
Hartford 7 9   .438 17 14   .548
Vermont 6 10   .375 9 20   .310
Stony Brook 5 11   .313 12 18   .400
UMass Lowell* 0 16   .000 3 26   .103
2017 America East tournament winner
As of March 18, 2017
*ineligible for postseason play due to Div. I transitions
Rankings from AP poll
2016–17 Atlantic 10 women's basketball standings
Conf Overall
Team W   L   PCT W   L   PCT
Dayton 13 3   .813 22 10   .688
George Washington 13 3   .813 20 10   .667
Saint Louis 12 4   .750 25 9   .735
Saint Joseph's 12 4   .750 17 15   .531
Fordham 11 5   .688 22 12   .647
La Salle 9 7   .563 17 13   .567
Duquesne 8 8   .500 18 16   .529
VCU 8 8   .500 16 15   .516
Richmond 7 9   .438 13 17   .433
George Mason 6 10   .375 13 17   .433
St. Bonaventure 4 12   .250 9 20   .310
Davidson 4 12   .250 6 23   .207
UMass 3 13   .188 9 21   .300
Rhode Island 2 14   .125 6 23   .207
2017 A10 Tournament winner
As of March 20, 2017
Rankings from AP poll
2016–17 ASUN women's basketball standings
Conf Overall
Team W   L   PCT W   L   PCT
Stetson 13 1   .929 26 7   .788
Florida Gulf Coast 12 2   .857 26 9   .743
Jacksonville 11 3   .786 23 9   .719
Kennesaw State 8 6   .571 10 20   .333
NJIT 4 10   .286 11 19   .367
North Florida 3 11   .214 10 20   .333
Lipscomb 3 11   .214 6 24   .200
USC Upstate 2 12   .143 9 21   .300
2017 ASUN Tournament winner
As of March 18, 2017
Rankings from AP poll
2016–17 ACC women's basketball standings
Conf Overall
Team W   L   PCT W   L   PCT
No. 2 Notre Dame 15 1   .938 33 4   .892
No. 9 Duke 13 3   .813 28 6   .824
No. 10 Florida State 13 3   .813 28 7   .800
No. 13 Louisville 12 4   .750 29 8   .784
No. 17 NC State 12 4   .750 23 9   .719
No. 21 Syracuse 11 5   .688 22 11   .667
No. 16 Miami (FL) 10 6   .625 24 9   .727
Virginia 7 9   .438 20 13   .606
Wake Forest 6 10   .375 16 16   .500
Georgia Tech 5 11   .313 22 14   .611
Virginia Tech 4 12   .250 20 14   .588
Pittsburgh 4 12   .250 13 17   .433
Clemson 3 13   .188 15 16   .484
North Carolina 3 13   .188 15 16   .484
Boston College 2 14   .125 9 21   .300
2017 ACC tournament winner
As of March 29, 2017
Rankings from AP poll
2016–17 Big East Conference women's basketball standings
Conf Overall
Team W   L   PCT W   L   PCT
No. 19 DePaul* 16 2   .889 27 8   .771
Creighton 16 2   .889 24 8   .750
Marquette 13 5   .722 25 8   .758
St. John's 11 7   .611 22 12   .647
Villanova 11 7   .611 20 14   .588
Georgetown 9 9   .500 17 13   .567
Providence 4 14   .222 12 18   .400
Xavier 4 14   .222 12 18   .400
Seton Hall 4 14   .222 12 19   .387
Butler 2 16   .111 6 25   .194
2017 Big East tournament winner
* Tournament #1 seed
As of March 29, 2017
Rankings from AP poll
2016–17 Big Sky women's basketball standings
Conf Overall
Team W   L   PCT W   L   PCT
Montana State 15 3   .833 25 7   .781
North Dakota 15 3   .833 20 11   .645
Northern Colorado 14 4   .778 22 8   .733
Eastern Washington 12 6   .667 19 14   .576
Idaho 11 7   .611 19 15   .559
Idaho State 10 8   .556 19 14   .576
Portland State 8 10   .444 16 17   .485
Weber State 6 12   .333 13 18   .419
Sacramento State 6 12   .333 10 20   .333
Northern Arizona 5 13   .278 9 21   .300
Montana 4 14   .222 7 23   .233
Southern Utah 2 16   .111 7 23   .233
2017 Big Sky tournament winner
As of March 23, 2017
Rankings from AP poll
2016–17 Big South women's basketball standings
Conf Overall
Team W   L   PCT W   L   PCT
Radford 14 4   .778 24 9   .727
Campbell 13 5   .722 21 8   .724
High Point 13 5   .722 15 14   .517
Liberty 12 6   .667 11 16   .407
Charleston Southern 11 7   .611 16 12   .571
Presbyterian 10 8   .556 12 17   .414
UNC Asheville 9 9   .500 18 15   .545
Gardner-Webb 6 12   .333 11 17   .393
Winthrop 1 17   .056 2 28   .067
Longwood 1 17   .056 4 25   .138
2017 Big South tournament winner
As of March 17, 2017
Rankings from AP poll
2016–17 Big Ten women's basketball standings
Conf Overall
Team W   L   PCT W   L   PCT
No. 4 Maryland 15 1   .938 32 3   .914
No. 11 Ohio State* 15 1   .938 28 7   .800
Michigan 11 5   .688 28 9   .757
Indiana 10 6   .625 23 11   .676
Purdue 10 6   .625 23 13   .639
Michigan State 9 7   .563 21 12   .636
Penn State 9 7   .563 21 11   .656
Northwestern 8 8   .500 20 11   .645
Iowa 8 8   .500 20 14   .588
Minnesota 5 11   .313 15 16   .484
Illinois 3 13   .188 9 22   .290
Wisconsin 3 13   .188 9 22   .290
Nebraska 3 13   .188 7 22   .241
Rutgers 3 13   .188 6 24   .200
2017 Big Ten tournament winner
* Tournament #1 seed
Rankings from AP poll
2016–17 Big West women's basketball standings
Conf Overall
Team W   L   PCT W   L   PCT
UC Davis 14 2   .875 25 8   .758
Long Beach State 12 4   .750 23 12   .657
Cal State Northridge 10 6   .625 18 14   .563
UC Riverside 9 7   .563 16 15   .516
UC Santa Barbara 9 7   .563 16 16   .500
Hawaii 7 9   .438 12 18   .400
Cal Poly 7 9   .438 11 18   .379
UC Irvine 3 13   .188 5 26   .161
Cal State Fullerton 1 15   .063 4 25   .138
2017 Big West tournament winner
As of March 23, 2017
Rankings from AP poll
2016–17 Big 12 Conference women's basketball standings
Conf Overall
Team W   L   PCT W   L   PCT
No. 5 Baylor 17 1   .944 33 4   .892
No. 14 Texas 15 3   .833 25 9   .735
No. 23 Oklahoma 13 5   .722 23 10   .697
No. 24 Kansas State 11 7   .611 23 11   .676
Iowa State 9 9   .500 18 13   .581
No. 22 West Virginia 8 10   .444 24 11   .686
Oklahoma State 6 12   .333 17 15   .531
Texas Tech 5 13   .278 14 17   .452
TCU 4 14   .222 12 18   .400
Kansas 2 16   .111 8 22   .267
2017 Big 12 Tournament winner
Rankings from AP poll [92]
2016–17 CAA women's basketball standings
Conf Overall
Team W   L   PCT W   L   PCT
Elon 16 2   .889 27 7   .794
James Madison 15 3   .833 26 9   .743
Drexel 11 7   .611 22 11   .667
Delaware 10 8   .556 16 14   .533
William & Mary 9 9   .500 20 11   .645
Northeastern 8 10   .444 12 19   .387
College of Charleston 6 12   .333 9 21   .300
Hofstra 5 13   .278 13 18   .419
Towson 5 13   .278 12 18   .400
UNC Wilmington 5 13   .278 11 20   .355
2017 CAA tournament winner
As of March 23, 2017
Rankings from AP poll
2016–17 Conference USA women's basketball standings
Conf Overall
Team W   L   PCT W   L   PCT
WKU 16 2   .889 27 8   .771
Middle Tennessee 15 3   .833 23 11   .676
Southern Miss 13 5   .722 23 11   .676
Charlotte 12 6   .667 21 10   .677
Louisiana Tech 12 6   .667 18 14   .563
Old Dominion 11 7   .611 17 14   .548
UTSA 10 8   .556 14 17   .452
Rice 8 10   .444 22 13   .629
UAB 8 10   .444 15 15   .500
North Texas 8 10   .444 12 19   .387
Marshall 5 13   .278 13 17   .433
UTEP 5 13   .278 8 23   .258
FIU 3 15   .167 5 24   .172
Florida Atlantic 0 18   .000 4 25   .138
2017 C-USA Tournament winner
As of March 26, 2017
Rankings from AP poll
2016–17 Horizon League women's basketball standings
Conf Overall
Team W   L   PCT W   L   PCT
Green Bay* 15 3   .833 27 5   .844
Wright State 15 3   .833 24 8   .750
Oakland 12 6   .667 18 12   .600
Detroit 12 6   .667 18 14   .563
Milwaukee 11 7   .611 20 11   .645
Cleveland State 9 9   .500 14 16   .467
Youngstown State 5 13   .278 9 21   .300
Northern Kentucky 5 13   .278 9 22   .290
Valparaiso 4 14   .222 10 20   .333
UIC 2 16   .111 6 24   .200
2017 Horizon League Tournament winner
* Tournament #1 seed
As of March 7, 2017
Rankings from AP poll
2016–17 Ivy League women's basketball standings
Conf Overall
Team W   L   PCT W   L   PCT
Penn 13 1   .929 22 7   .759
Princeton 9 5   .643 16 13   .552
Harvard 8 6   .571 21 9   .700
Cornell 7 7   .500 16 11   .593
Brown 7 7   .500 16 12   .571
Yale 6 8   .429 15 12   .556
Columbia 3 11   .214 13 14   .481
Dartmouth 3 11   .214 8 19   .296
2017 Ivy League Tournament winner
Rankings from AP Poll
2016–17 Mid-American Conference women's basketball standings
Conf Overall
Team W   L   PCT W   L   PCT
East
Kent State 13 5   .722 19 13   .594
Ohio 12 6   .667 22 10   .688
Buffalo 10 8   .556 22 10   .688
Miami (OH) 5 13   .278 11 21   .344
Bowling Green 4 14   .222 8 23   .258
Akron 2 16   .111 9 21   .300
West
Central Michigan 15 3   .833 23 9   .719
Ball State 14 4   .778 21 11   .656
Toledo 12 6   .667 25 9   .735
Northern Illinois 12 6   .667 21 12   .636
Western Michigan 8 10   .444 19 13   .594
Eastern Michigan 1 17   .056 6 25   .194
2017 MAC tournament winner
As of March 17, 2017
2016–17 MAAC women's basketball standings
Conf Overall
Team W   L   PCT W   L   PCT
Quinnipiac 17 3   .850 29 7   .806
Rider 16 4   .800 24 9   .727
Fairfield 13 7   .650 17 14   .548
Siena 13 7   .650 14 16   .467
Iona 12 8   .600 18 13   .581
Marist 11 9   .550 15 17   .469
Monmouth 9 11   .450 15 16   .484
Canisius 8 12   .400 10 21   .323
Niagara 5 15   .250 8 22   .267
Manhattan 4 16   .200 8 22   .267
Saint Peter's 2 18   .100 3 27   .100
2017 MAAC tournament winner
As of March 25, 2017
Rankings from AP poll
2016–17 MEAC women's basketball standings
Conf Overall
Team W   L   PCT W   L   PCT
Bethune-Cookman 15 1   .938 19 9   .679
Howard 12 4   .750 16 12   .571
Hampton 11 5   .688 17 12   .586
Norfolk State 9 7   .563 14 14   .500
Florida A&M 9 7   .563 11 18   .379
North Carolina A&T 8 8   .500 12 17   .414
Savannah State 8 8   .500 11 18   .379
Coppin State 8 8   .500 8 20   .286
Morgan State 7 9   .438 9 20   .310
North Carolina Central 7 9   .438 8 20   .286
Maryland-Eastern Shore 6 10   .375 12 15   .444
South Carolina State 2 14   .125 5 22   .185
Delaware State 2 14   .125 3 26   .103
2017 MEAC tournament winner
As of March 6, 2017
Rankings from AP poll
2016–17 Missouri Valley Conference women's basketball standings
Conf Overall
Team W   L   PCT W   L   PCT
No. 20 Drake 18 0   1.000 28 4   .875
Northern Iowa 15 3   .833 24 8   .750
Missouri State 12 6   .667 16 14   .533
Southern Illinois 10 8   .556 16 15   .516
Wichita State 9 9   .500 15 16   .484
Evansville 8 10   .444 14 17   .452
Bradley 7 11   .389 12 19   .387
Indiana State 6 12   .333 12 18   .400
Illinois State 4 14   .222 8 23   .258
Loyola–Chicago 1 17   .056 2 28   .067
2017 MVC tournament winner
As of March 15, 2017
Rankings from AP poll
2016–17 Mountain West Conference women's basketball standings
Conf Overall
Team W   L   PCT W   L   PCT
Colorado State 15 3   .833 25 9   .735
Wyoming 13 5   .722 22 10   .688
Boise State 12 6   .667 25 8   .758
UNLV 12 6   .667 22 11   .667
New Mexico 10 8   .556 15 15   .500
Utah State 9 9   .500 17 14   .548
Fresno State 8 10   .444 18 15   .545
San Jose State 7 11   .389 11 21   .344
San Diego State 6 12   .333 11 19   .367
Nevada 5 13   .278 11 19   .367
Air Force 2 16   .111 4 25   .138
2017 MW Tournament winner
Rankings from AP poll
2016–17 Northeast Conference women's basketball standings
Conf Overall
Team W   L   PCT W   L   PCT
Robert Morris 14 4   .778 22 11   .667
Sacred Heart 13 5   .722 17 15   .531
Saint Francis (PA) 13 5   .722 17 15   .531
Bryant 11 7   .611 18 14   .563
Mount St. Mary's 10 8   .556 12 18   .400
Central Connecticut 9 9   .500 11 20   .355
Fairleigh Dickinson 6 12   .333 8 22   .267
St. Francis Brooklyn 6 12   .333 8 22   .267
LIU Brooklyn 5 13   .278 6 23   .207
Wagner 3 15   .167 4 25   .138
2017 NEC tournament winner
As of March 12, 2017
Rankings from AP poll
2016–17 Ohio Valley Conference women's basketball standings
Conf Overall
Team W   L   PCT W   L   PCT
Belmont 16 0   1.000 27 5   .844
Morehead State 11 5   .688 21 9   .700
SIU Edwardsville 9 7   .563 14 18   .438
Austin Peay 8 8   .500 14 16   .467
UT Martin 8 8   .500 12 20   .375
Murray State 7 9   .438 15 14   .517
Southeast Missouri State 7 9   .438 13 17   .433
Eastern Kentucky 7 9   .438 13 19   .406
Tennessee Tech 7 9   .438 10 20   .333
Jacksonville State 6 10   .375 13 15   .464
Tennessee State 5 11   .313 10 16   .385
Eastern Illinois 5 11   .313 9 19   .321
2017 OVC tournament winner
As of March 4, 2017
Rankings from AP poll
2016–17 Pac-12 Conference women's basketball standings
Conf Overall
Team W   L   PCT W   L   PCT
No. 8 Oregon State 16 2   .889 31 5   .861
No. 6 Stanford 15 3   .833 32 6   .842
No. 12 Washington 15 3   .833 29 6   .829
No. 15 UCLA 13 5   .722 25 9   .735
Arizona State 9 9   .500 20 13   .606
Oregon 8 10   .444 23 14   .622
California 6 12   .333 20 14   .588
Washington State 6 12   .333 16 20   .444
Colorado 5 13   .278 17 16   .515
Utah 5 13   .278 16 15   .516
USC 5 13   .278 14 16   .467
Arizona 5 13   .278 14 16   .467
2017 Pac-12 Tournament winner
As of March 31, 2017
Rankings from AP Poll
2016–17 Patriot League women's basketball standings
Conf Overall
Team W   L   PCT W   L   PCT
Bucknell 16 2   .889 27 6   .818
Navy 14 4   .778 24 10   .706
Army 12 6   .667 22 9   .710
American 11 7   .611 15 16   .484
Boston University 11 7   .611 13 17   .433
Colgate 7 11   .389 10 20   .333
Loyola (MD) 6 12   .333 11 20   .355
Holy Cross 6 12   .333 8 21   .276
Lehigh 5 13   .278 10 20   .333
Lafayette 2 16   .111 4 28   .125
2017 Patriot League tournament winner
As of March 4, 2017
Rankings from AP poll
2016–17 Southern Conference women's basketball standings
Conf Overall
Team W   L   PCT W   L   PCT
Mercer 12 2   .857 25 6   .806
Chattanooga* 12 2   .857 21 10   .677
East Tennessee State 8 6   .571 16 14   .533
UNC Greensboro 7 7   .500 17 14   .548
Furman 7 7   .500 14 17   .452
Samford 4 10   .286 12 19   .387
Wofford 3 11   .214 13 17   .433
Western Carolina 3 11   .214 8 22   .267
2017 SoCon Tournament winner
* Tournament #1 seed
2016–17 Southland Conference women's basketball standings
Conf Overall
Team W   L   PCT W   L   PCT
Central Arkansas 16 2   .889 26 5   .839
Abilene Christian* 16 2   .889 23 9   .719
Lamar 15 3   .833 22 8   .733
Stephen F. Austin 14 4   .778 25 8   .758
New Orleans 9 9   .500 14 15   .483
McNeese State 8 10   .444 14 17   .452
Texas A&M-CC 8 10   .444 14 18   .438
Northwestern State 7 11   .389 13 17   .433
Nicholls State 7 11   .389 10 20   .333
Incarnate Word* 7 11   .389 9 20   .310
Houston Baptist 4 14   .222 6 22   .214
SE Louisiana 3 15   .167 5 24   .172
Sam Houston State 3 15   .167 3 25   .107
2017 Southland tournament winner
As of March 20, 2017
*ineligible for conference and NCAA tournament postseason play due to Div. I transition
Rankings from AP poll
2016–17 SEC women's basketball standings
Conf Overall
Team W   L   PCT W   L   PCT
No. 3 South Carolina 14 2   .875 33 4   .892
No. 7 Mississippi State 13 3   .813 34 5   .872
No. 18 Kentucky 11 5   .688 22 11   .667
No. 25 Missouri 11 5   .688 21 11   .656
Tennessee 10 6   .625 20 12   .625
Texas A&M 9 7   .563 22 12   .647
LSU 8 8   .500 20 12   .625
Auburn 7 9   .438 17 15   .531
Georgia 7 9   .438 16 15   .516
Ole Miss 6 10   .375 17 14   .548
Alabama 5 11   .313 22 14   .611
Florida 5 11   .313 15 16   .484
Vanderbilt 4 12   .250 14 16   .467
Arkansas 2 14   .125 13 17   .433
2017 SEC tournament winner
Rankings from AP poll
2016–17 SWAC women's basketball standings
Conf Overall
Team W   L   PCT W   L   PCT
Grambling State 14 4   .778 16 13   .552
Texas Southern 14 4   .778 20 9   .690
Alabama State 12 5   .706 13 14   .481
Southern 11 7   .611 13 13   .500
Arkansas-Pine Bluff 9 9   .500 12 17   .414
Alcorn State 9 9   .500 9 20   .310
Prairie View A&M 8 10   .444 13 17   .433
Mississippi Valley State 7 11   .389 10 19   .345
Jackson State 5 12   .294 11 16   .407
Alabama A&M 0 18   .000 2 25   .074
2017 SWAC tournament winner
As of March 4, 2017
Rankings from AP poll
2016–17 Sun Belt Conference women's basketball standings
Conf Overall
Team W   L   PCT W   L   PCT
Little Rock 17 1   .944 25 8   .758
UT Arlington 14 4   .778 22 8   .733
Troy 12 6   .667 22 10   .688
Louisiana–Lafayette 11 7   .611 20 11   .645
Texas State 11 7   .611 16 14   .533
Georgia Southern 9 9   .500 13 17   .433
Coastal Carolina 8 10   .444 13 16   .448
Georgia State 8 10   .444 12 18   .400
Appalachian State 6 12   .333 12 19   .387
South Alabama 5 13   .278 11 20   .355
Arkansas State 4 14   .222 7 25   .219
Louisiana–Monroe 3 15   .167 6 24   .200
2017 Sun Belt Tournament winner
As of March 15, 2017
Rankings from AP poll
2016–17 Summit League women's basketball standings
Conf Overall
Team W   L   PCT W   L   PCT
Western Illinois 13 3   .813 26 7   .788
IUPUI 12 4   .750 24 9   .727
South Dakota State 12 4   .750 23 9   .719
South Dakota 11 5   .688 23 9   .719
Omaha 8 8   .500 16 15   .516
Oral Roberts 7 9   .438 15 15   .500
North Dakota State 4 12   .250 6 24   .200
Denver 3 13   .188 6 24   .200
Fort Wayne 2 14   .125 5 24   .172
2017 Summit League Tournament winner
As of March 19, 2017
Rankings from AP Poll
2016–17 West Coast Conference women's basketball standings
Conf Overall
Team W   L   PCT W   L   PCT
Gonzaga 14 4   .778 26 7   .788
BYU 13 5   .722 20 12   .625
Saint Mary's 13 5   .722 20 13   .606
San Francisco 11 7   .611 18 13   .581
Loyola Marymount 9 9   .500 14 16   .467
Santa Clara 9 9   .500 14 16   .467
San Diego 7 11   .389 14 16   .467
Pacific 5 13   .278 10 21   .323
Pepperdine 5 13   .278 7 23   .233
Portland 4 14   .222 6 24   .200
2017 WCC tournament winner
As of March 18, 2017
Rankings from AP poll
2016–17 WAC women's basketball standings
Conf Overall
Team W   L   PCT W   L   PCT
New Mexico State 14 0   1.000 24 7   .774
Cal State Bakersfield 10 4   .714 15 14   .517
Seattle 10 4   .714 15 18   .455
UTRGV 8 6   .571 19 14   .576
Grand Canyon* 7 7   .500 15 12   .556
UMKC 4 10   .286 10 19   .345
Utah Valley 3 11   .214 9 22   .290
Chicago State 0 14   .000 0 29   .000
2017 WAC tournament winner
As of March 19, 2017
Rankings from AP poll
* Ineligible for WAC Basketball Tournament as part of reclassification from Division II

Coaching changes[edit]

Several teams changed coaches during and after the season.

Team Former
coach
Interim
coach
New
coach
Reason
Arkansas Jimmy Dykes Mike Neighbors Dykes resigned at the end of his third season, finishing with a 43–49 overall record and 16–36 in the SEC, capped off with an 11-game losing streak to end this season.[93] Washington's Neighbors was hired as his replacement.[94]
Belmont Cameron Newbauer Bart Brooks Newbauer left to fill the Florida vacancy.[95] DePaul assistant Brooks was hired as his replacement.[96]
Cal State Fullerton Daron Park Jeff Harada Park was fired after 4 seasons in the wake of numerous allegations of misconduct with his players.[97] The school went to Division II for their next hire, tabbing Central Washington's Jeff Harada as the next head coach.
Davidson Michele Savage Gayle Coats Fulks Savage was fired on March 8 after seven seasons.[98] The school hired Wake Forest asst. Fulks as her replacement.[99]
Delaware Tina Martin Jeanine Radice Natasha Adair Martin announced her Retirement on April 28. Asst. Radice was named interim coach during the school coaching search. The school would then hire Georgetown's Adair as the next head coach.[100]
Denver Kerry Cremeans Jim Turgeon Cremeans resigns on March 17. Turgeon was hired as the next coach.
Eastern Illinois Debbie Black Matt Bollant Black was fired after 4 seasons, composing a 34-80 overall record with a 21-43 record in Ohio Valley Conference play. Former Illinois coach Bollant was hired as the next coach.[101]
Florida Amanda Butler Cameron Newbauer Butler was fired on March 6—her 45th birthday—after 10 seasons at her alma mater. Despite being ranked by the AP in the preseason, the Gators finished with their second losing record in three seasons, and remain the only women's team on the campus that has never won a conference championship.[102] Florida hired Belmont head coach Newbauer.[95]
Florida Atlantic Kellie Lewis-Jay Jim Jabir Lewis-Jay was fired on March 6 after five seasons and an overall 73–103 record. Jabir was hired as the next coach.[103]
Georgetown Natasha Adair James Howard Adair left for the Delaware opening.[100] Top assistant Howard was promoted to head coach.
Grambling State Nadine Domond Freddie Murray Domond left to take an asst. coaching position at Rutgers on July 1, 2016. Asst. coach Murray was named interim coach for 2016-17. He later had the tag removed on April 6, 2017
Grand Canyon Trent May Milee Karre Nicole Powell May was fired on March 7 after 10 seasons. Top assistant Karre was named interim head coach during the search for May's successor.[104] Oregon asst. coach and former WNBA star Powell was tabbed as the next head coach.[105]
Illinois Matt Bollant Nancy Fahey Bollant was fired on March 14 after five seasons. He went 61–94 overall and 22–62 in Big Ten play, and had been sued in 2015 by seven former players who alleged racial harassment.[106] The Illini turned to Women's Basketball Hall of Fame coach Fahey from Division III Washington (MO), where she led the Bears to five national titles and 737 wins in 31 seasons.[107]
Illinois State Barb Smith Kristen Gillespie Smith was fired on March 13 after four seasons. She inherited a program that had put together seven straight winning seasons, but the Redbirds went 28–93 during her tenure.[108] Illinois State hired Gillespie from Division II in-state school Lewis.[109]
Lafayette Theresa Grentz C.K. Calhoun Kia Damon Grentz was fired on April 4 after two seasons and a 10–51 overall record and 6–30 in conference play. Top assistant Calhoun was named as interim head coach during the search for Grentz' successor.[110] The school would then hire Cincinnati asst. Damon as their next head coach.
Long Beach State Jody Wynn Jeff Cammon Wynn left for the Washington opening.[111] The school hired Colorado asst. Cammon, who was previously an assistant under Wynn for 5 seasons.
Maine Richard Barron Amy Vachon Barron was forced to take an extended medical leave on January 6 due to an as-yet-undetermined, but not life-threatening, neurological condition.[112] Vachon took over on an interim basis at that time. Her interim term was extended after the end of the season in order to allow Barron to seek further treatment and determine if he can return to coaching.[113]
Marshall Matt Daniel Tony Kemper Daniel resigned on March 12 after five seasons, citing family reasons, specifically an opportunity to move back to his home state of Arkansas.[114] Marshall promoted top assistant Kemper to fill the vacancy.[115]
Mississippi Valley State Jessica Kern Ashley Walker Kern left after 1 season for the Tennessee State opening. The school went to the NAIA for their next hire, tabbing Wiley College's Walker as the next coach.
Mount St. Mary's Bryan Whitten Maria Marchesano Whitten was fired on March 22. IUPUI asso. head coach Marchesano was hired as his replacement.
Murray State Rob Cross Rechelle Turner Cross was fired on February 27 after nine seasons. While he led the Racers to an OVC regular-season title in his first season, the Racers never finished higher than fourth in the conference during the rest of his tenure.[116] The Racers went a mere five minutes' drive for their new coach, hiring Turner after 21 seasons as head coach at their city's high school.[117]
Nevada Jane Albright Amanda Levens Albright announced her retirement on March 1, effective at season's end, after 33 seasons as a Division I head coach and nine at Nevada.[118] The Wolf Pack hired top Arizona State assistant Levens, who had been a Nevada assistant from 2003 to 2008.[119]
New Mexico State Mark Trakh Brooke Atkinson Trakh left for the USC vacancy.[120] Atkinson, who served as an assistant at New Mexico State from 2003 to 2011, was hired after serving as an assistant coach at Colorado State for the last three seasons.
North Carolina Central Vanessa Taylor Kendra Eaton Trisha Stafford-Odom Taylor was fired on March 23 after an 8–21 season and a 33–113 overall record in five seasons. The Eagles, after naming assistant Eaton as interim coach during their search for a permanent replacement, hired Stafford-Odom, a former assistant at UCLA, North Carolina, and Duke, from Division II Concordia–Irvine.[121]
Old Dominion Karen Barefoot Nikki McCray Barefoot left for the UNC Wilmington opening.[122] The school hired former WNBA All-Star McCray-Penson, who spent the last 9 seasons as an assistant under Dawn Staley at South Carolina.[123]
Pepperdine Ryan Weisenberg DeLisha Milton-Jones Weisenberg was fired on March 8 after four seasons in which the Waves went 28–94, capped off with a 7–23 record this season. The Waves hired Milton-Jones, who joined the program as an assistant at the start of the season after 17 seasons playing in the WNBA.[124]
Southeastern Louisiana Errol Gauff Ayla Guzzardo Gauff resign from Southeastern Louisiana on March 9. Guzzardo was hired as the next coach.
Tennessee State Larry Joe Inman Jessica Kern Inman resigned as head coach on March 9, 2017, citing personal reasons. Mississippi Valley State coach Jessica Kern was hired as his replacement.[125]
UNCW Adell Harris Karen Barefoot Harris resigned from UNCW on April 12, 2017 to pursue other interests. The school hired Old Dominion's Barefoot as her replacement.[122]
USC Cynthia Cooper-Dyke Mark Trakh Cooper-Dyke resigned after the Trojans' season ended with a first-round loss in the Pac-12 Tournament on March 3. She had led the Trojans to an NCAA appearance in her first season in 2014, but the Trojans posted mediocre records in her other three seasons, ending with a 14–16 mark this season.[126] The Trojans brought back Trakh, who had been their head coach from 2004 to 2009, from New Mexico State.[120]
UTEP Keitha Adams Kevin Baker Adams left for the Wichita State opening.[127] The school hired Baker from Division II Angelo State to be their next head coach.
Washington Mike Neighbors Jody Wynn Neighbors left for the Arkansas opening.[94] The school hired Long Beach State's Wynn as his replacement.[128]
Wichita State Jody Adams-Birch Linda Hargrove Keitha Adams The Shockers parted ways with Adams-Birch on January 22 with the team at 8–10 on the season. She had been temporarily replaced by top assistant Kirk Crawford three days earlier while AD Darron Boatright reviewed the program. Following Adams-Birch's departure, former Shockers head coach Hargrove was brought back to serve for the remainder of the season.[129][130] Wichita State ultimately hired UTEP head coach Keitha Adams as the permanent replacement.[127]
Winthrop Kevin Cook Lynette Woodard The Eagles parted ways with Cook on February 24 after suspending him in January for what the school called a personnel matter. Top assistant Woodard was named interim coach during Cook's suspension,[131] and Winthrop removed the interim tag after the season.[132]

See also[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ Although Cheryl Miller, who starred at USC during the 1980s, then had more career points than either Plum or Ogwumike, she never played in the Pac-12 (or, as it was known during her career, the Pac-10). The conference did not sponsor women's sports until the 1986–87 season, the season after Miller's graduation.
  2. ^ Lynette Woodard finished her career at Kansas in 1981 with 3,649 points, more than Plum's final career total of 3,527. However, Woodard's entire career was in the era when women's college sports were governed by the AIAW; the NCAA did not organize women's sports until the 1981–82 season.

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